question to christian anons:. how can i become a practicing christian?

question to christian anons:
how can i become a practicing christian?
i always believed in christ, but i dont feel anything inside me to actually act different, as if i was just a non-believer.
where can i start? what books can i read?
i think i will just kill myself after i try this way and it doesnt give me a fulfilling life.

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  1. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >how can i become a practicing christian?
    You go to church and ask your priest.

    >i always believed in christ, but i dont feel anything inside me to actually act different, as if i was just a non-believer.
    Correct, you feel that way until you die.

    >where can i start?
    By going to church and asking a priest.

    >what books can i read?
    Whatever the priest tells you to read.

  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the Sermon on the Mount. If you are unmoved you do not believe.

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Find a local Catholic church and attend a mass. Don't receive communion as you haven't prepared for it properly (just sit in the pew, let people get up to go themselves), but just go and listen to the sermon and the homily and see. Then schedule a talk with the priest (look for the church website online), sign up for a catechuman class once you're ready.
    >where can i start? what books can i read?
    Well the Bible of course. Once you start to get some more concrete questions about tradition, apologetics are next (whatever you're concerned about). Whatever the priest advises. Whatever strikes you basically. Follow your own heart and interest.
    >i think i will just kill myself after i try this way and it doesnt give me a fulfilling life.
    You have to realize a mindset like that is part of the reason why you feel unmoved. Learn to soften your heart.

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    The only book you need is the Bible. Read it through. Really read it, and ask the Lord for comprehension. You really have to believe He'll give it to you, and when He does, you'll start to understand.

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go to church, get baptized, read the bible.
    Don't get involved in denominational autism as a new convert, you'll become insufferable.

  6. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hey why does that guy's shield have a swastika is he a knot-c or something?

  7. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Begome Orbodox
    You don't have to deal with the mess that is the RCC in its current state and you get the whole Christian tradition, it's a win-win

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Roman Catholic Church, despite perceived challenges, possesses a rich theological and historical foundation that merits careful consideration. Firstly, drawing from the Bible, the Catholic Church can find support in Matthew 16:18, where Jesus declares, "You are Peter, and on this rock, I will build my Church." This biblical foundation highlights the enduring significance of the Church in Christian tradition.

      Additionally, Church Fathers such as Augustine and Aquinas contributed profound theological insights that continue to shape Catholic doctrine. Augustine's "City of God" and Aquinas's Summa Theologica remain cornerstones of Christian philosophy. These theological giants have provided enduring guidance, demonstrating the Church's intellectual and spiritual depth.

      Addressing concerns about the Church's perceived messiness, it is crucial to recognize that internal challenges are not exclusive to Catholicism. All religious institutions face complexities. Furthermore, the Catholic Church's commitment to addressing issues through councils, such as Vatican II, exemplifies its adaptability and commitment to growth.

      Critiquing Internet Orthodoxy by contrasting it with the Roman Catholic Church oversimplifies a nuanced landscape. Both traditions have vibrant theological discussions, but dismissing the Catholic Church as a mess overlooks the robust intellectual and spiritual resources it offers. Embracing the full Christian tradition involves recognizing the enduring contributions of the Roman Catholic Church and engaging in a respectful dialogue that transcends simplistic dichotomies.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >The Roman Catholic Church, despite perceived challenges, possesses a rich theological and historical foundation that merits
        Let me stop you and remind you that trannies, Francis, psychologist, appeaser.

        Oh, and you have demon numbers of course. The RCC is anti-Christian.

        Orthodoxy is the way.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Let me stop you and remind you that trannies, Francis, psychologist, appeaser.

          Your Church has never been the subject of attacks and subversion like ours because your Church is largely irrelevant. You've been stuck in the Balkans for 1000 years getting roflstomped by the Ottomans, by the Serbs, by the Soviets, by everyone who's come your way and picked a fight with you. Meanwhile we actually evangelized the entire world, we fufilled the Great Commission.

          Of course we got attacked and subverted hard after World War II. We're the only ones that matter. Not you. They didn't even bother with YOU. The enemies of God came for us above every other Church, because they know we're the One True Church of Jesus Christ.

          And they still couldn't kill us. Satan is a loser.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Have you not been following the supplanting of the Orthodox Church in Ukraine? The difference isn't relevance, but simply the fact that the Vatican has a centralised structure.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Your Church has never been the subject of attacks and subversion like ours
            I can't even begin to imagine how little you'd have to know on the matter to say something this moronic.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >666
        Not reading it GPT Satan, Orthodoxy wins

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >ad-hominem

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >ad hominem fallacy fallacy

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >begging the question

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >no true Scottsman

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Additionally, Church Fathers such as Augustine and Aquinas contributed profound theological insights that continue to shape Catholic doctrine
        That's exactly the problem. Once you start to prioritize autistic philsoophical models and systems to say who God is over seeing Him as a living experience, The Way - you fall for nominalism and start compensating doctrine to adapt to modern sensibilities. True Orthodoxy is unwavering in the teachings of the church fathers and most importantly preserving and LIVING what Jesus taught.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        How is it so easy to tell when nigAI writes something? It only takes one or two sentences.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      How do you know which Ortobox church is good when they keep anathemizing each other and can't agree amongst themselves about doctrine?

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Load of rubbish, they're all good, politics doesn't matter, and they don't have to agree on everything, that's silly. Catholics don't agree on countless things either, Tibetan Buddhism has several schools of thought and remains a unified tradition.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Catholicism had multiple schools of thought too, before the Muslims took over all of them.

  8. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think you should read the book of John, and if still undecided just read the whole bible. The second thing is to find a church. Now depending on where you live, the churches might be awful unfortunately, and it may be even worse to attend a church where they don't preach the bible, but just spout their own opinions, and reference a lot of other human written literature. I personally am basically protestant, but I do think a lot depends on where you live, some areas just have bad churches. if you live in a bigger city there often are more churches so I suppose it would be a more pressing matter to see if you believe in catholic, protestant, or orthodox beliefs, for me I would see what the Bible says and compare that to what the church says.

  9. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >not Oyish
    >not Oyish
    >not Oyish
    >where can I start? what books can I read
    >not Oyish
    wrote 6 sentences and only one was even remotely related to literature.
    Any ways, Christianity starts with belief. You can't rationalize yourself into believing in God

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's literally how I became Christian.

  10. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just do it

  11. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >how can i become a practicing christian?
    Da Church
    >i always believed in christ, but i dont feel anything inside me to actually act different, as if i was just a non-believer.
    You're not practicing, this might be why. There's a reason a Church and a community was the basis of the faith for so long. It isn't until very recently that people started believing in some kind of personal God and that your faith is just between you and him. That's isolating, and for a religion all about love, it doesn't work. But if you think you're just going to get a warm fuzzy feeling after doing a few things and walk around, blessed, you'll be disappointed. It's a long hard road, and lots of us perennially struggle with doubt.
    >where can i start? what books can i read?
    Start showing up to mass, learn the prayers, LOVE others (I can't believe people are skipping this, this religion specifically isn't an exam you just need to learn the theory for)
    There isn't a necessary reading list. Just Da Bible, and then continue from there based on what you want to know.
    >i think i will just kill myself after i try this way and it doesnt give me a fulfilling life.
    Setting yourself up for failure, eh? I'm not your shrink but you seem to be punishing yourself for something, so try to get your ass to confession.

  12. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >how can i become a practicing christian?
    get baptized. it doesn't matter how but it does matter by who.
    >but i dont feel anything inside me to actually act different
    you need to take the initiative. start actively trying to be good to yourself and your peers.
    >where can i start? what books can i read?
    the bible, front to back. i'd reccomend reading just the new testament a second time over and pray on the ideas.
    >i think i will just kill myself
    you cannot have a nice day and call yourself a believer in christ, those are mutually exclusive things. you should accept first that in giving his life, christ absolved you of your sin and you are forgiven by him. to waste the life given to you is to commit murder and spit in the face of he who brought you in to the world. you are to leave on his terms, not your own.

  13. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    you can start by following the commandments

  14. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >i always believed in christ, but i dont feel anything inside me to actually act different, as if i was just a non-believer.

    It quite literally happened, now act as if you accept the good news in the fullness of truth. The woes of the world and your particular likes/dislikes are water off a duck's back.

  15. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Being a christian is pretty much exactly the same as being anyone else, you just have to repent your sins to go to heaven, but other than that you are saved by the grace of God.

  16. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    What do you think you would do, as a Christian, that you are currently not doing? Just go do that thing. There is no great mystery to it: you have to do things because your principles tell you to do them, and not because you feel a desire to do them. Emotions are just noise in the end.

    I suggest you should go to Church, do volunteer work and give to charity. Faith without works is dead.

  17. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the Bible frequently and meditate on its precepts. Pray "without ceasing." Offer your thoughts and will up in loving prayer, and pray for faith, for love, and for submission to God's will. Pray through the Lord's Prayer, working to understand what each portion of it means relative to your life. Join a church (a Calvinist myself, I would recommend a denomination that I find close to the Bible, like the Baptists), and, as other anons have recommended, ask for guidance. It doesn't have to be a priest, but someone like a pastor with a doctorate in Biblical Studies and fifty years' experience dealing one-on-one with people's spiritual lives will probably have insight that can prove valuable to you. Love others in spirit and truth. There are also thousands upon thousands of books about the Christian walk to help you, regardless of how highbrow or lowbrow you are, or how literally or philosophically minded you are, ranging from explanations of flora, fauna, and nations in the text to exegesis and pondering by Kierkegaard. Dwell in the Gospels and seek the Holy Spirit. Anything you have questions about has already been written about, but understand that you can't wait for absolute answers to every question. Take part in fellowship in a church with a body of believers and love others. Volunteer, donate to church and to charities, restrain yourself from snapping at people who slight you, think seriously about how much of your life is devoted to accumulating meaningless pleasure for yourself, and fix it.

    My prayers are with you. Build these patterns into your life, and remember that God's love for you exceeds the strongest love you have felt from anyone or will feel for anyone in yourself in the entirety of your lifetime. He died in agony "to seek and to save the lost." He rose again in glory, and by his abundant grace, not by your own goodness, you can do so too.

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