Any book recs for Islamic history?

I want to learn about Islamic history, his different sects relate to each other, that kind of stuff. Any recommendations?

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Venture of Islam by Marshall Hodgson is the standard text

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just read the Koran.

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    This book is one of the best: A History of the Muslim World to 1405: The Making of a Civilization
    https://www.amazon.com/History-Muslim-World-1405-Civilization/dp/0130983896

    It has a sequel too but I haven't read that one.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Two sequels apparently. The three might have some overlap.
      The first one is from 2003, the second from 2007 and the third from 2017.
      > https://www.amazon.com/History-Muslim-World-since-1260/dp/0132269694
      > https://www.amazon.com/History-Muslim-World-1750-Civilization/dp/1138215937
      However, most history books in general tend to focus on littoral mainland Asia and North Africa. The Inner Eurasian regions tend to be the most overlooked.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        What is inner Eurasia? Central Asia like the Stan countries? Also, do you know of any books that cover south East Asian islam? An Indonesian I know told me that there exists varying degrees of syncretism between Islam and native spirituality/religion, and I find that super interesting.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >What is inner Eurasia? Central Asia like the Stan countries?
          Central Asia is part of it but also Ukraine, Western Russia and Southwest Siberia where Muslim polities were prominent. Muslims were also prominent across the Eastern Balkans, Southern Vietnam and Northern Philippines.

          >An Indonesian I know told me that there exists varying degrees of syncretism between Islam and native spirituality/religion, and I find that super interesting.
          Syncretism has existed in most parts of the Muslim World in some form or another, for some amount of time or another. I would say the 20th century marked the gradual decline of syncretism in most parts of the wider Muslim World, but it still exists.

          The most prevalent Islamic syncretism would have to be in Cambodia, followed by Cote d'Ivoire and Sierra Leone, followed by maybe parts of Central Africa. There's also the Alevi, Bektashi, Alawi and Alian populations spread out between the Balkans, Anatolia and the Levant.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Alevi, Bektashi, Alawi and Alian populations
            literally the same flavor of shit

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I know told me that there exists varying degrees of syncretism between Islam and native spirituality/religion
          in Vietnam there are the cham bani

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >in Vietnam there are the cham bani
            Most of the Cham Muslims in Vietnam are Sunni, I believe. However, the Cham Muslim diaspora in Cambodia are split between Sunni and a highly syncretic sect.

            Central and Southern Vietnam used to be the Kingdom of Champa; The Cham are an Austronesian people. Viets are from Northern Vietnam.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            autism. you could have just searched cham bani the name of the group.
            >Central and Southern Vietnam used to be the Kingdom of Champa; The Cham are an Austronesian people. Viets are from Northern Vietnam.
            autism

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >autism. you could have just searched cham bani the name of the group.
            Cham Bani just means Cham Tribe. You turbo autist.
            >autism
            Again, wtf are you talking about, schizo.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            moron
            https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/ubccommunityandpartnerspublicati/52387/items/1.0373592

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            I know exactly who they are. They're a syncretic sect who iirc are much more prominent as a percentage of the Cham Muslims in Cambodia than in Vietnam.

            I think the Shia descriptor is incorrect. Like practically all Islamic syncretisms they probably elevate Ali and Hussein which led to some observer to label them Shia, which then gets reposted all over the internet and across mainstream media since.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >in Vietnam.
            >I think the Shia descriptor is incorrect. Like practically all Islamic syncretisms they probably elevate Ali and Hussein

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm curious to know what their opinions of Abu Bakr, Omar and Osman are. If they reject them, then they're a Shia sect. If not, then they're not Shia.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            uskut ya yahudi

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hello there.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      At least one of those authors is a israelite-bootlicker.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >ad hominem

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The way books are titled these days is so gay.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        The whole point is to sell copies because they will never be taken seriously academically.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      notice how none of these have academic relevance, they're based on schachts and goldzihers theories, which harald motzki describes as needy of critical revision

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        is there any proof mecca was an important religious and commercial center before muhammad, or even during muhammad's life?

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          There's a passage in Psalms, "Blessed are those who dwell in your house, they are ever praising you. Blessed are those whose strength is in you, whose hearts are set on pilgrimage, as they pass the valley of Baka"

          The Qur'an says, "Surely the first House established for man was by Bakka, blessed and a guidance for the Worlds" But, Bakka could mean tears. Luxenbourg has this insane theory that Bakka means a fence or something, which is funny

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yet another abdool who has zero idea what he's talking about.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Valley of Bacca with an altar and a spring where pilgrimage and sacrifice is done, hmmm what Bakka could that be

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Near Jerusalem.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            yea and a day there is 1000x better than anywhere else alr

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          it doesnt matter

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Schacht was completely btfo by Al-Azami, especially about Hadith. Any muslim or non-muslim interested in Islamic history should read Studies in Early Hadith Literature by Al-Azami, which gives a rundown of the beginnings of Islamic literature, both oral and written, since the time of the Companions. His research is invaluable

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yea definetely, after that theres been barely anything serious in western academia contrary to what we find in traditional academia, azamis simple argument that it is impossible that everyone across the muslim countries made up such authentic isnads is enough, especially with the literature, fuat sezgins geschichte was valuable for everybody as well

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sahih Bukhari is useful to add context to the day to day. Fair warning though it was a game of telephone before it was written down.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    standard for biography

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    standard for rashidun caliphate

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    just history, the most classical

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      nice...

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        understanding is important, because with other religious nations he doesnt intend single prophets nations but nations like the persians and so on, i believe the translation is distorting it a little with words like "persuasion"

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    standard study about the history of quran by dr azami

    reception:
    In this field Dr Azmi has done pioneer work of the highest value, and he has done it according to the exact standards of scholarship. The thesis which he presented, and for which Cambridge conferred on him the degree of Ph.D., is in my opinion one of the most exciting arid original investigations in this field of modern times. Arthur John Arberry
    William Montgomery Watt has called ʿĀzamî "one of the most important Islamic scholars of our time." Watt credited ʿĀzamî with "restoring the study of Islamic theology to its proper place at the center of Islamic studies."
    John L. Esposito has called ʿĀzamî "a leading figure in the development of Islamic Studies as a modern academic discipline." Esposito credited ʿĀzamî with "playing a key role in bringing Islamic thought and scholarship into conversation with Western intellectual traditions.

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    for hadith

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Patricia Crone's Medieval Islamic Political Thought has a very good and succinct rundown of the several different early Islamic sects.

  12. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Part of Al-Tabari's history is on libgen, which covers from the time of Adam to the Abbasids I believe

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      yea but it is edited by an antiislamic israelite

  13. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    No Western cucks can teach you about Islam, the Arabs laugh at their ignorance of the Arabic language and culture. Jay Smith is a prime example, he's been studying Islam for 20 years and can barely pronounce Arabic words it's funny how that moron Amerimutt Evangelical tries to sound Arab. For 1300 years these IndoEuro Christcucks never learned Arabic.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      You don't need to know Arabic to understand what Islam is.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        of course you dont need to know arabic, but you need to study arabic if you want to be a serious historian about arabic literature

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      You cannot take western academics serious, they are so extremely stubborn, arabic has 2 million common words, the academics are so stubborn that they do not spend any time learning any arabic grammar and the gharib vocab, thats why they make so many errors like joseph schacht in his origins, i think now theyve just given up

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      over 90% of muslims do not speak arabic

      it doesnt matter

      mad cope

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        roughly 75% dont speak arabic

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        roughly 75% dont speak arabic

        How does that work? My admittedly little understanding of Islam is that the Quran isn't really the actual Quran unless it's in Arabic. So in order to be read the Quran you would have to possess at least a decent amount of (classical?) Arabic to make any sense of it.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Most non-arabs recite the quran in Arabic and read the translation. Learning Arabic is obligatory, as religious knowledge is obligatory, but learning a language is hard

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I remember reading this brutal speech in college. Can't remember it in whole but paraphrasing
    >O people of Iraq
    >I see the necks ripe under beards ready for harvesting
    >You have sinned yadda yadda yadda
    >Allah has inspected his arrows and found me his cruelest, now he aims me at you
    >By Allah, I will beat you like marwa stones! I will split you like trees!
    And so on.

    Any idea who has this speech? And the actual text?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      stop being a homosexual

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just read a bunch of first hand accounts from travellers to the various Muslim lands across the years, or those who were engaged in wars in those lands and so on. After that, read In Khaldun. You can honestly use ChatGPT to recommend to you the booklist.

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