You are not Christian if you are outside the Orthodox church

You are not Christian if you are outside the Orthodox church

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

Nothing Ever Happens Shirt $21.68

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

  1. 6 months ago
    Dirk

    Which

  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >And John answered him, saying, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name, and he followeth not us: and we forbad him, because he followeth not us. But Jesus said, Forbid him not: for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name, that can lightly speak evil of me. For he that is not against us is on our part. For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name, because ye belong to Christ, verily I say unto you, he shall not lose his reward.
    >Mark 9:38-41

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    According to who? Jesus?

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >If you don't follow my church which bows down to Icons and prays to Saints (even though the Church fathers hated both of those) YOU'RE NOT A REAL CHRISTIAN

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >(even though the Church fathers hated both of those)
      Bro, St John of Damascus spoke in defense of icons back when Islam was first appearing and you have veneration of saints for a good part of church history, including stuff like St Cyril of Alexandria making a feast for St John Chrysostom. There's ancient prayers to Theotokos dating to the first centuries of christianity.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        [citation needed]
        and no hearsay like the icon allegedly painted by Luke.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Easy, just google it.
          https://christianhistoryinstitute.org/study/module/john-of-damascus
          >Always aware of my own unworthiness, I would have kept silent and merely confessed my shortcomings to God, but all things are good at the right time. I see the Church which God founded on the Apostles and Prophets with the cornerstone of Christ his Son, tossed on an angry sea, beaten by rushing waves, and shaken by the assaults of evil spirits. I see rips in the seamless robe of Christ which wicked men have tried to pull apart, and His body cut into pieces (i.e. the word of God and the ancient tradition of the Church). Because of this I have decided it is wrong to hold my tongue, remembering the warning in the Bible: “If you see the sword coming and do not warn your brother, I will hold you guilty of his blood.” [Ez. 33.8] Fear compelled me to speak. The truth was stronger than the majesty of kings.

          Now, our opponents say, “God commanded Moses the law-giver, 'You will worship the Lord your God, and only him, and not make an image for yourself of anything in heaven above, or on the earth below.' “ [Ex. 20:3-4] But they are wrong, and do not know the Scriptures. The letter kills while the spirit gives life, [2 Cor. 3:6] and they fail to find the spiritual meaning hidden in the letter. I say to these people, the Lord who taught you this would teach you more. Listen to the law-giver’s interpretation of this law in Deuteronomy: “This is to stop you looking up to the heavens and, seeing the sun, moon and stars, being deceived by error and worshipping and serving them.” [Deut. 4.19] The whole point of this is that we should not adore a created thing more than the Creator, nor give true worship to anything but him. But worship of false gods is not the same as venerating holy images.
          Cont.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Again, God says, “You shall not have any gods other than me. You shall not make yourself a graven image, or any likeness. You shall not adore them or serve them, for I am the Lord thy God.” [Deut. 5.7-9] You see that he forbids image,making to avoid idolatry, and because it is impossible to make an image of the immeasurable, invisible God. As St Paul said at the Areopagus, “As we are the offspring of God, we must not imagine God to be like gold, silver, stone, or anything created by humans.” [Acts 17.29] But these instructions were given to the israelites because they were prone to idolatry. We, on the other hand, are no longer tied to apron strings. We have outgrown superstitious error, and know God in truth, worshipping him alone, enjoying the fullness of his knowledge. We are no longer children but adults. We receive our habit of mind from God, and know what may be depicted and what may not. The Scripture says, “You have not seen his face.” [Ex. 33.20] How wise the Law is! How could one depict the invisible? How picture the inconceivable? How could one express to the limitless, the immeasurable, the invisible? How give infinity a shape? How paint immortality? How put mystery in one place?

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >But when you think of God, who is a pure spirit, becoming man for your sake, then you can clothe him in a human form. When the invisible becomes visible to the eye, you may then draw his form. When he who is a pure spirit, immeasurable in the boundlessness of his own nature, existing as God, takes on the form of a servant and a body of flesh, then you may draw his likeness, and show it to anyone who is willing to contemplate it. Depict his coming down, his virgin birth, his baptism in the Jordan, his transfiguration on Mt Tabor, his all-powerful sufferings, his death and miracles, the proofs of his deity, the deeds he performed in the flesh through divine power, his saving Cross, his grave, his resurrection and his ascent into heaven. Give to it all the endurance of engraving and color. Have no fear or anxiety; not all veneration is the same. Abraham venerated the sons of Emmor, impious men who were ignorant of God, when he bought the double cave for a tomb. [Gen. 23.7] Jacob venerated his brother Esau and the Egyptian Pharaoh. [Gen 33.3] He venerated, but he did not worship in the full sense. Joshua and Daniel venerated an angel of God [Jos. 5.14, Dan. 8:16-17] they did not worship in the full sense.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Worship is one thing, veneration another. The invisible things of God have been made visible through images since the creation of the world. We see images in creation which remind us faintly of God, e.g. in order to talk about the holy and worshipful Trinity, we use the images of the sun and rays of light, a spring and a full river, the mind and speech and the spirit within us, or a rose tree, a sprouting flower, and a sweet fragrance. Also events in the future can be foreshadowed mystically by images. For instance, the ark represents the image of Our Lady, the Mother of God. So does the staff and the earthen jar. The bronze serpent shows us the one who defeated the bite of the original serpent on the Cross [Jn 3:14-15] the sea, water and the cloud depict the grace of baptism. [I Cor. 10.1]

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >You must understand that there are different degrees of worship. First of all the full worship which we show to God, who alone is by nature worthy of worship. But, for the sake of God who is worshipful by nature, we honor and venerate his saints and servants. It is in this sense that Joshua and Daniel worshipped an angel, [Jos. 5.14, Dan. 8:16-17] and David worshipped the Lord’s holy places, when be said, “Let us go to the place where his feet have stood.” [Ps. 132.7] Similarly, his dwelling place is worshipped, as when all the people of Israel adored in the tabernacle, and they stood round the temple in Jerusalem gazing at it from all sides worshipping, as they still do. Similarly, we honor the rulers established by God, as when Jacob gave homage to Esau, his elder brother, [Gen. 33.3] and to Pharaoh, the divinely established ruler. [Gen. 47.7] And Joseph was worshipped by his brothers. [Gen. 50.18] That kind of veneration is based on honour, as in the case of Abraham and the sons of Emmor. [Gen. 23.7] So then, either do away with all worship, or accept it in all its different kinds. Answer me this question: “Is there only one God?" Yes, you answer, there is only one Law-giver.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >>So why would his commands contradict each other? The cherubim, for example, are mere creatures. Why, then, does he allow cherubim, carved by human hand, to overshadow the mercy—seat in the temple? Obviously it is impossible to make an image of God because is infinite and changeless, or of someone like God because creation should not be worshipped as God. But he allowed the people to make an image of the cherubim who are finite and who lie in adoration before his throne, overshadowing the mercy-seat. It was fitting that the image of the heavenly choirs should overshadow the divine mysteries. Would you say that the ark of the covenant and staff and mercy-seat were not made by human hands? Do they not consist of what you call contemptible matter? What was the tabernacle itself? Was it not an image? Did it not depict a reality beyond itself? This is why the holy Apostle says that the rituals of the law, “serve as an example and shadow of heavenly things.” [Heb. 8.5] Moses, when he came to finish the tabernacle, was told “make sure that you make everything according to the pattern that you were shown on the Mountain.” [Ex. 25.40] The law was not an image itself, but it shrouded the image. In the words of the same Apostle, “the law contains the shadow of the goods to come, not the image of those things.” [Heb. 10.1]

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >So, since the law is a forerunner of images, how can we say that it forbids images? Should the law ban us from making images, when the tabernacle itself was a depiction, a foreshadowing? No. There is a time for everything. [Eccl. 3.1] In the old days, the incorporeal and infinite God was never depicted. Now, however, when God has been seen clothed in flesh, and talking with mortals, [Baruch 3.37] I make an image of the God whom I see. I do not worship matter, I worship the God of matter, who became matter for my sake, and deigned to inhabit matter, who worked out my salvation through matter. I will not cease from honoring that matter which works my salvation. I venerate it, though not as God. How could God be born out of lifeless things? And if God’s body is God by its union with him, it is changeless. The nature of God remains the same as before, the flesh created in time is brought to life by a logical and reasoning soul.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >John of Damascus
        Does not represent the majority of the Church Fathers. He was literally centuries removed from them and nor was his works very convincing to many bishops considering they agreed on Iconoclasm

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >He was literally centuries removed from them
          And? Protestant reformers were almost a millenium away and you talk about them. Even Luther was somewhat more okay with icons. Further you have church fathers like St Basil the Great talking about icons.
          >St. Basil the Great ca. 330-379: According to the blameless faith of the Christians which we have obtained from God, I confess and agree that I believe in one God the Father Almighty; God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Ghost; I adore and worship one God, the Three. I confess to the œconomy of the Son in the flesh, and that the holy Mary, who gave birth to Him according to the flesh, was Mother of God. I acknowledge also the holy apostles, prophets, and martyrs; and I invoke them to supplication to God, that through them, that is, through their mediation, the merciful God may be propitious to me, and that a ransom may be made and given me for my sins. Wherefore also I honour and kiss the features of their images, inasmuch as they have been handed down from the holy apostles, and are not forbidden, but are in all our churches. (Letter 360)
          Iconoclasm was anathemised at the second council of Nicea.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Iconoclasm was anathemised at the second council of Nicea.
            Illegitimate council convened by a woman

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >And? Protestant reformers were almost a millenium away and you talk about them
            didn't mention them at all.
            >Iconoclasm was anathemised at the second council of Nicea.
            Quite literally the entire West outside of the Papacy rejected it. Nor was it a popular decision which alligned with many bishops and it was overturned.

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    So Christians are supposed to sacrifice animals to saints? I thought Christ was the lad sacrifice.

  6. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    The ortholarp fad is over, we're in the "reverting to islam" arc now.

  7. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    A real Christian don't give a frick about it. A real Christian follows Jesus' teachings. Learn about Francis of Assisi.

  8. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    By that logic, you aren't a true Christian unless you were baptized in the Jordan River and speak Aramaic like Jesus did.

  9. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    You are not christian if you aren't one of apostles

  10. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do you support the existence of a rightful homeland for the israeli people?

  11. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Idolatry is a sin.

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