Why the protestant reformation never reached the Iberian Peninsula?

Why the protestant reformation never reached the Iberian Peninsula? It spread all across Britain, central, northern and western Europe, but why never in Iberia, even when Portugal and Spain were strong centers of christian faith at the time?

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  1. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    It had a few groups of dissenters (very few though).
    But it never caught on for the same reason it never touched Italy.
    The Catholics were too strongly positioned and rabidly persecuted them all. Regardless, I don't think German-style Protestantism is all that attractive to Latins south of the Alps anyway.
    But there were a couple of reformers here and there, same with Italy. They all had to flee eventually though.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      You know nothing of Iberians

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        You posted a map of France. I used south of the Alps wrong, yes. The point still stands, Habsburgs didn't like Luther, and neither did the pope.

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          >you know nothing of iberians
          >*posts France*

          As I said, nothing.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        >you know nothing of iberians
        >*posts France*

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Seville was a nest of protestantism in the XVI century. The reason it didn't prosper is because protestants were exterminated. Killed the dog over is the rabies.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        woops wrong video

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        There were a few tens of Lutherans, hardly a "nest". The illuminados were a bigger problem. Italy had similar levels of random Lutherans.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        It wasn't. The thing is that Seville was a primary trading port as well as the hub for all maritime enterprises overseas, so there was quite a number of foreigners and merchants, some parroting in heretic tongues, but their charlatanery never gain any ground.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      because spain didn't feel like being heretical lol

  2. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Protestantism is Northern European thing. Greek orthodoxy is southern Europeans Protestantism

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Well.... about that....

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        >moron has no clue what he's talking about
        many such cases

  3. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Their leaders derived a lot of their legitimacy from the special relationship Iberia had with the papacy.

  4. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Spain just finished the Reconquista in 1492 so it had a strong foundations and organization of pro-Catholic orgs and inquisition running around rooting out any sniff of treason. They were already purging Muslims and israelites so adding protestants to the list wasn't a huge hurdle on top of witches/heretics/atheists/etc... So Spain was in a uniquely strong position to resist the Protestant Reformation of the 1500s.

    It's a bit like how Japan was well armed and supplied with a readily assembled US Army post-WW2 so they kind of just threw that at the Korean peninsula since they had it around.

  5. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    a liitle thing called the Spanish Inquisition

  6. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Precisely because they were strong centers of the christian faith. Protestantism appealed originally in shitholes that were pagans a few centuries before and/or had corrupt clergy, and primarily among the illiterate mob and peasantry before it became and golden land-grabbing opportunity for the nobility and burgeousie: northern germany, southern france, scandinavia. The case of England is different, anglicanism was catholicism with the king at the top because wouldn't let the fat frick divorce. Then he said frick it, got me 7 b***hes one after the other and oh yeah, let's do the land-grabbing thing too for a flavour of protestantism while we are at it.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      The English reformation was more than that, the dissenters were an eruption of schizophrenia bigger than anything else the continent had ever seen.

  7. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    In Germany it was a power grab for the Junker nobility to rebel against the HRE and in England it was because Henry VIII didn't know how babies get made.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Well they certainly weren't getting made in Catherine of Aragon's dessicated, poisoned womb

  8. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why the protestant reformation never reached the Iberian Peninsula?
    Take a look at any map of literacy in Europe before 1900 lol

  9. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why the protestant reformation never reached the Iberian Peninsula?
    they kicked the israelites out

  10. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Spaniards were hardcore catholics since the Age of the Reconquista. Also they had a strong controll of the Papacy that was thus favorable to them.

  11. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    The half israelite Tomas Torquemada

  12. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Spain wasn't economically advanced enough to support a mercantile middle class looking to usurp power from the nobility

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Castilian urban middle class was the first to challenge the power of the nobility.
      And got btfo and destroyed by the Habsburgs

  13. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    >France remained Catholic even after 7 or whatever wars or religion
    >Only land border with Spain besides that micro state
    I wonder why

  14. 9 months ago
    Anonymous
  15. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    They had people who translated the Bible into Spanish like Francisco de Enzinas, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Cipriano de Valera and Casiodoro de Reina.

  16. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Portuguese (and some Andalusians) were the closest to becoming Protestant. If Antonio Prior of Crato prevailed over Phillip II in 1580, he would have cooperated less with the Papacy and tolerated Protestant heretics similar to how the French and Poles did. Also the Portuguese may not have lost their colonies to the Dutch since they'd still be allies, or at least they would have lost them to the Spanish/French later on. The Japanese also would've been more accepting of Christianity if the Portuguese were in charge of proselytization instead of the Spanish.

    At one point in the mid 1500s, Lisbon became a hub of Lutheran theology.

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