Why did paganism lose to Christianity?

Why did paganism lose to Christianity?

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  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Paganism wasn't so much a religion, it was more so just the common understanding of how the world worked, and in particular it viewed the world as a rather cruel and unforgiving place.

    Christianity on the hand was a zealous group of radicals who believed that salvation was at hand.
    They believed that anyone who would not convert was doomed to damnation and that all who would convert would be saved.

    The Christians preached love and tolerance, and they practised it as well... however once they gained enough numbers they completely and utterly oppressed the Pagans into extinction. It says less about Christianity and more about the nature of cults in general.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Massive cope. Paganism was a moral order unto itself, particular Roman paganism which directly connected religion with the state. The reason why Paganism died off is because the entire relationship between Pagan gods and their worshipers broke down, sacrifices to storm clouds and volcanoes did not prevent anything, and priests who tried to insist that they just weren't worshiping correctly were ignored. Christianity offered a far more direct transaction: You become a Christian, you get into a good afterlife. End of story. Additionally, there were no class or gender restrictions to Christianity. It was a religion for everyone, not a cult for a minority of worshipers.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        >The reason why Paganism died off is because the entire relationship between Pagan gods and their worshipers broke down
        Anon, I'm glad that you want to believe the best about your own religion but we have a very clear picture of what the early spread of Christianity looked like and it wasn't pretty. The anon you're replying to was absolutely correct when he said
        >once they gained enough numbers they completely and utterly oppressed the Pagans into extinction.
        We have ample evidence of this, often from the written accounts of the very people who were in charge of eradicating pagans. This was especially notable among the Celtic peoples, whose indigenous religions were suppressed so effectively that the only evidence we have of their existence is from the writings of the Christians who were in charge of systematically destroying them.

        >In the Gallic Wars of 58–51 BC, the Roman army, led by Julius Caesar, conquered the many tribal chiefdoms of Gaul, and annexed it as a part of the Roman Republic. According to accounts produced in the following centuries, the new rulers of Roman Gaul subsequently introduced measures to wipe out the druids from that country. According to Pliny the Elder, writing in the 70s CE, it was the emperor Tiberius (ruled 14–37 CE), who introduced laws banning not only druid practices, and other native soothsayers and healers
        This was the beginning of what would become common practice across most of Western Europe. It was the complete opposite of the sort of natural breakdown you're suggesting: pagan religions were violently oppressed, religious leaders were crucified, rituals were outlawed, etc.

        We have further evidence of the fact that early Christianity only survived in Europe by threat of force by the fact of how many areas quickly reverted to their original religious practices once Rome began to decline in power.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >but we have a very clear picture of what the early spread of Christianity looked like and it wasn't pretty.
          You mean the part where the Romans started turning to various cults and Christianity was the most successful of them? Yeah, that was pretty embarrassing for paganism.
          >once they gained enough numbers they completely and utterly oppressed the Pagans into extinction.
          Ah yes, the old "witch burnings and inquisition" myth. Going to start mumbling about Wicca next?
          >In the Gallic Wars of 58–51 BC...
          I don't see what Julius Caesar has to do with anything. Also, the Romans adopted many Gallic deities, with a horse deity being popular. Claiming that the native Gallic religion was "oppressed" is absurd, as the Romans had no means or interest in doing so. If anything, the 'Druids' (a concept that is highly disputed, as even going by Caesar as a primary source his word is inherently biased) probably referred to various anti-Roman priests exclusively, rather than the religion as a whole. Rome didn't give a shit about the gods of other countries, they only cared if you pledged fealty to the gods that helped ensure the stability of the Roman state - and any other local god was a local matter.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            What do you get out of denying basic history? You're acting like this is some sort of competition where you can "win" by arguing that, I don't even know, Christianity outcompeted Pagan religions by purely peaceful methods? Frankly, given the tone of your posts, I'm surprised you're not proud of the image of Christians slaughtering those evil Pagans. I'm not on a team, by the way, just explaining the history to you.

            >You mean the part where the Romans
            Yes, Roman Christians were the main ones engaged in persecuting Pagans and the writings of those Romans are our primary sources of information on the indigenous religions of Europe.

            >Ah yes, the old "witch burnings and inquisition" myth.
            We're talking about the early expansion of Christianity into Europe, which took place more than 1000 years prior to the Inquisition.

            >Claiming that the native Gallic religion was "oppressed" is absurd, as the Romans had no means or interest in doing so.
            My son, they literally banned all native religion on pain of death. What an absurd point to argue against. The initial suppression of Gallic religions took place less than a century after Jesus' death; it wasn't even Christians doing the oppressing at that point. Are you really expanding your argument from
            >Christians never violently oppressed competing religions
            to
            >Ancient Rome never violently oppressed indigenous religion in conquered provinces
            because if so, you're really biting off more than you can chew.

            In any case, there's nothing wrong with being honest about the history of your faith. I presume you're uncomfortable with these facts because you would consider it wrong to violently spread your religion, but the fact that others have done so in the past doesn't lesson your own faith. You don't need to be so defensive over things that have been basic history for millennia.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          What do you get out of denying basic history? You're acting like this is some sort of competition where you can "win" by arguing that, I don't even know, Christianity outcompeted Pagan religions by purely peaceful methods? Frankly, given the tone of your posts, I'm surprised you're not proud of the image of Christians slaughtering those evil Pagans. I'm not on a team, by the way, just explaining the history to you.

          >You mean the part where the Romans
          Yes, Roman Christians were the main ones engaged in persecuting Pagans and the writings of those Romans are our primary sources of information on the indigenous religions of Europe.

          >Ah yes, the old "witch burnings and inquisition" myth.
          We're talking about the early expansion of Christianity into Europe, which took place more than 1000 years prior to the Inquisition.

          >Claiming that the native Gallic religion was "oppressed" is absurd, as the Romans had no means or interest in doing so.
          My son, they literally banned all native religion on pain of death. What an absurd point to argue against. The initial suppression of Gallic religions took place less than a century after Jesus' death; it wasn't even Christians doing the oppressing at that point. Are you really expanding your argument from
          >Christians never violently oppressed competing religions
          to
          >Ancient Rome never violently oppressed indigenous religion in conquered provinces
          because if so, you're really biting off more than you can chew.

          In any case, there's nothing wrong with being honest about the history of your faith. I presume you're uncomfortable with these facts because you would consider it wrong to violently spread your religion, but the fact that others have done so in the past doesn't lesson your own faith. You don't need to be so defensive over things that have been basic history for millennia.

          >>In the Gallic Wars of 58–51 BC, the Roman army, led by Julius Caesar, conquered the many tribal chiefdoms of Gaul, and annexed it as a part of the Roman Republic. According to accounts produced in the following centuries, the new rulers of Roman Gaul subsequently introduced measures to wipe out the druids from that country. According to Pliny the Elder, writing in the 70s CE, it was the emperor Tiberius (ruled 14–37 CE), who introduced laws banning not only druid practices, and other native soothsayers and healers
          >This was the beginning of what would become common practice across most of Western Europe. It was the complete opposite of the sort of natural breakdown you're suggesting: pagan religions were violently oppressed, religious leaders were crucified, rituals were outlawed, etc.
          So let me get this straight, you're saying that pagans had begun oppressing other pagans before Christianity even existed? The frick?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >So let me get this straight, you're saying that pagans had begun oppressing other pagans before Christianity even existed?
            Nice reading comprehension, anon. We'll turn you into a scholar yet! Yes, this was indeed what I meant by "this was the beginning". The systems of oppression that were put in motion by emperors like Tiberius would be adopted by Christians in later centuries (it takes more than a generation or two to fully eradicate beliefs and practices that have been around for thousands of years, after all) for the express purpose of converting pagans to Christianity. These systems also provided a legal framework for mobs of Christians to direct all manner of violence at pagans with little worry of repercussion.

            >A particularly telling instance occurs in the writings of the great pagan scholar Libanius, who addresses his complaint to Emperor Theodosius himself against passionate Christians engaged in mob acts of destruction of all things pagan. In his words: “This black-robed tribe, who eat more than elephants, and by the quantities of drink they consume, weary those that accompany their drinking with the singing of hymns; these hasten to attack the temples with sticks and stones and bars of iron and, in some cases disdaining these with hands and feet.
            >The monks did more than destroy property. He goes on to say, “I forbear to mention the numbers they have murdered in their rioting in utter disregard of the name they share.” But the, major damage was done to sacred sites. “In a state after a state, shrine after shrine has been wiped out by their insolence, violence, greed and deliberate lack of self-control.”

            Look, you can google this stuff yourself if you honestly don't know anything about the early days of Christianity. It seems very strange to me that you're apparently devout enough to be so defensive of your religion and yet you know so little of its history.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            You heard it here, folks. Julius Caesar - secret Christian - started destroying Paganism by... conquering Gaul.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            that was not what that anon wrote, stop trying to argue in bad faith

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            That's exactly what he wrote. He's schizo. He conflates "druids", a secret priesthood that may not have even existed (all we have to go on is descriptions of human sacrifice, which is likely propaganda), with the overall Gallic religion and tries to claim that the destruction of paganism started there, except that the Romans didn't force their religious pantheon on anyone and instead just absorbed various local pantheons - because that's how Greco-Roman paganism works. But oh, that Julius Caesar, him and him alone is responsible.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            You heard it here, folks. Julius Caesar - secret Christian - started destroying Paganism by... conquering Gaul.

            Again, you're flat out arguing in bad faith. Anyone in the thread can read the post you're referring to and see that you're outright lying about what is said in it.
            >The systems of oppression that were put in motion by emperors like Tiberius would be adopted by Christians in later centuries
            That doesn't at all imply that Caesar or Tiberius were Christians. And yes, Caesar's invasion of Gaul was indeed the beginning of the end for Paganism, even if that end was still many centuries away.

            I'm confused as to why you're reacting to this with so much defensiveness and anger. Is this all new information for you? Did you really think that the spread of Christianity into Europe was nothing but people holding hands and singing about how much they love Jesus?

            And frankly, we haven't even touched on what would happen in later centuries once Christianity became the official religion of Rome. This began with a little thing called the Edict of Thessalonica, in 380 AD:
            >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edict_of_Thessalonica
            >We order the followers of this law to embrace the name of Catholic Christians; but as for the others, since, in our judgment they are foolish madmen, we decree that they shall be branded with the ignominious name of heretics, and shall not presume to give to their conventicles the name of churches. They will suffer in the first place the chastisement of the divine condemnation and in the second the punishment of our authority which in accordance with the will of Heaven we shall decide to inflict

            Are you going to tell us that even this doesn't qualify as oppression of pagans by christians? I could sit here all day giving you blatant examples of Christianity being spread through violence but as I said, you're not here to argue in good faith, you're here to plat this sad Oyish game of lying and misrepresenting others' positions in the hopes that they'll give up and leave so you can "win". It's an incredibly bad habit.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            What do you get out of denying basic history? You're acting like this is some sort of competition where you can "win" by arguing that, I don't even know, Christianity outcompeted Pagan religions by purely peaceful methods? Frankly, given the tone of your posts, I'm surprised you're not proud of the image of Christians slaughtering those evil Pagans. I'm not on a team, by the way, just explaining the history to you.

            >You mean the part where the Romans
            Yes, Roman Christians were the main ones engaged in persecuting Pagans and the writings of those Romans are our primary sources of information on the indigenous religions of Europe.

            >Ah yes, the old "witch burnings and inquisition" myth.
            We're talking about the early expansion of Christianity into Europe, which took place more than 1000 years prior to the Inquisition.

            >Claiming that the native Gallic religion was "oppressed" is absurd, as the Romans had no means or interest in doing so.
            My son, they literally banned all native religion on pain of death. What an absurd point to argue against. The initial suppression of Gallic religions took place less than a century after Jesus' death; it wasn't even Christians doing the oppressing at that point. Are you really expanding your argument from
            >Christians never violently oppressed competing religions
            to
            >Ancient Rome never violently oppressed indigenous religion in conquered provinces
            because if so, you're really biting off more than you can chew.

            In any case, there's nothing wrong with being honest about the history of your faith. I presume you're uncomfortable with these facts because you would consider it wrong to violently spread your religion, but the fact that others have done so in the past doesn't lesson your own faith. You don't need to be so defensive over things that have been basic history for millennia.

            Strictly speaking, the Romans eradicated the Druids as an institution, they did not "oppress" or "ban" Gaulish religion. In fact, the Roman establishment in Gaul heavily patronized the local religion in state cult and religiosity. Gaulish religion was practiced up until Constantine made it illegal to practice any religion other than Christianity and Judaism, and even then it was practiced until Justinian actually started executing people for it en masse.

            I suppose you could be a Druid-revanchist and argue that Gaulish religion without the Druids was critically hobbled or something (what a strange case to prosecute in the current year).

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            > they did not "oppress" or "ban" Gaulish religion

            >According to Pliny the Elder, writing in the 70s CE, it was the emperor Tiberius (ruled 14–37 CE), who introduced laws banning not only druid practices, but other native soothsayers and healers

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            This was already addressed in

            [...]
            Strictly speaking, the Romans eradicated the Druids as an institution, they did not "oppress" or "ban" Gaulish religion. In fact, the Roman establishment in Gaul heavily patronized the local religion in state cult and religiosity. Gaulish religion was practiced up until Constantine made it illegal to practice any religion other than Christianity and Judaism, and even then it was practiced until Justinian actually started executing people for it en masse.

            I suppose you could be a Druid-revanchist and argue that Gaulish religion without the Druids was critically hobbled or something (what a strange case to prosecute in the current year).

            .

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >primary source, fricking Pliny the Elder, literally states "Tiberius created laws that banned Gallic religious practices"
            >you claim that you "addressed" this by saying "uhhh actually no that's not true"
            incredibly weak effort anon, even by the standards of this board

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            See

            [...]
            Strictly speaking, the Romans eradicated the Druids as an institution, they did not "oppress" or "ban" Gaulish religion. In fact, the Roman establishment in Gaul heavily patronized the local religion in state cult and religiosity. Gaulish religion was practiced up until Constantine made it illegal to practice any religion other than Christianity and Judaism, and even then it was practiced until Justinian actually started executing people for it en masse.

            I suppose you could be a Druid-revanchist and argue that Gaulish religion without the Druids was critically hobbled or something (what a strange case to prosecute in the current year).

            . Pliny says that institutions that were hostile to Rome were destroyed. The Gaulish religion was not. You're a tradlarper, so think of it like what you do with the Pope. The Pope, the Vatican, the College of Cardinals, the Bishops, those are all bad, but the prayers, the doctrines, the dogmas, those are all just fine. The fact that Emperors were patronizing this stuff is a demonstration of that.

            [...]
            Again, you're flat out arguing in bad faith. Anyone in the thread can read the post you're referring to and see that you're outright lying about what is said in it.
            >The systems of oppression that were put in motion by emperors like Tiberius would be adopted by Christians in later centuries
            That doesn't at all imply that Caesar or Tiberius were Christians. And yes, Caesar's invasion of Gaul was indeed the beginning of the end for Paganism, even if that end was still many centuries away.

            I'm confused as to why you're reacting to this with so much defensiveness and anger. Is this all new information for you? Did you really think that the spread of Christianity into Europe was nothing but people holding hands and singing about how much they love Jesus?

            And frankly, we haven't even touched on what would happen in later centuries once Christianity became the official religion of Rome. This began with a little thing called the Edict of Thessalonica, in 380 AD:
            >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edict_of_Thessalonica
            >We order the followers of this law to embrace the name of Catholic Christians; but as for the others, since, in our judgment they are foolish madmen, we decree that they shall be branded with the ignominious name of heretics, and shall not presume to give to their conventicles the name of churches. They will suffer in the first place the chastisement of the divine condemnation and in the second the punishment of our authority which in accordance with the will of Heaven we shall decide to inflict

            Are you going to tell us that even this doesn't qualify as oppression of pagans by christians? I could sit here all day giving you blatant examples of Christianity being spread through violence but as I said, you're not here to argue in good faith, you're here to plat this sad Oyish game of lying and misrepresenting others' positions in the hopes that they'll give up and leave so you can "win". It's an incredibly bad habit.

            >That doesn't at all imply that Caesar or Tiberius were Christians.
            Caesar (Julius and Augustus) and Tiberius secretly having converted to Christianity and/or Judaism was widely held by early Christians as a simple fact given by Divine Revelation. It was held as one of the core Christian doctrines, alongside Jesus being born in a cave.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >This was the beginning of what would become common practice across most of Western Europe. It was the complete opposite of the sort of natural breakdown you're suggesting: pagan religions were violently oppressed, religious leaders were crucified, rituals were outlawed, etc.
          Reminds me of the humanists killing christians for the sake of it and banning everything christian

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Completely and utterly wrong. Christianity takes its idea of heaven from Elysium, which is where it was believed heroes, the righteous, and the chosen few went after they died.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Christians preached love and tolerance

      Christianity preaches enslavement and murdering children if they believe in a different god, what the frick are you on? Not even the Romans were that awful.

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Monotheism is a more virulent form of religion and can easily infect polytheist cultures as they are more tolerant to new gods to be included in their pantheons.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Monotheism sits in a weird place on the theological spectrum, it’s ultimately a midwit philosophy which is why it’s the most popular form of theism today

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        I buy that. Yet monothism depending on the sect seems to try to revert to polythism. Like angels with various atributes and saint venneration. Old pantheons had a chief god surrounded by other gods that symbolized forces of nature and concepts. I have a theory that monothism is unatural to the mind and its perfers polythism and animism in some more extream cases over monothism. Thats why things like the trinity saints angels pop up in monthism. Even sects of Islam do this. Sufi for example.

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    The pagan gods were weak and couldn't preserve their religion.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Like how yahweh is weak and can't preserve his religion

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        The three abrahamic religions are the largest in the world and their number of followers keep increasing.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >abrahamic

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, abrahamic.

            Did I stutter?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, christianity islam and judyism are all based on the same israeli tribal foundation myth with the same myth characters such as ~~*abraham*~~.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, your numbers swell with africans and browns

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Most Africans are either Muslim or Christian, both of which are Abrahamic religions.

            Are you moronic?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, that's what my post said.

            How fricking stupid are you christc**t?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not a christcuck, moron. But the victory of Abrahamism over paganism is absolute and undeniable.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Concession accepted

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >t.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because abrahamism is a motile globohomosexual thought infection that seeks to swell up the numbers (this is the only victory that matters to them, Oyish christians are insignificant larpers with their own special intepretations.) and overrun the world before decaying from the inside by succumbing to the wishes of trannies, homosexuals, pedophiles, israelites and the many sub-saharan africans/generic browns that make up the bulk of genuine believers. Abrahamoids are nihilistic people that will let their first world nations rot so long as they can make the numbers go up with as many subhumans as they can. They believe they can escape the consequences by escaping to bootleg elysium after they ACK themselves. Note that in all their prophecies, the world collapsing first is "part of the plan."
            tl;dr -

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >"Our religion is successful"
            >"BUT BLACK PEOPLE"
            >"Is your religion successful?"
            >"BLACKS"
            >"Successful among whites?"
            >"ALL I CAN THINK ABOUT IS BLACK DICK!"

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >brings up black penis for no reason
            americans are obsessed

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            You are the one who started b***hing about muh blak plp

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            how does the comic continue?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Cope

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Greco-Roman paganism
    >only great heroes get a good afterlife, normies just become shades in Hades
    >Norse paganism
    >you have to die in combat to get a good afterlife
    >Christianity
    >even the lowliest peasant can get into heaven through faith in Christ
    It's obvious to see why Christianity would gain converts.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >only great heroes get a good afterlife, normies just become shades in Hades
      It's not even a good afterlife. The Romans and Greeks were like the Babylonians, they thought only life had meaning and the afterlife was the opposite of meaning. Nothing but eternal regret for the vast majority of people, and if you ended up in Elysium then you simply had a nicer environment to mope in. This is a key tenet of the Orphic mystery cult as well. You want to be alive, not dead, and those who can cheat death are venerated. Even in Norse Mythology, which does have heroes getting the 'good' afterlife, it's all in preparation for the Aesir's final defeat. So it's only 'good' for a finite period, and then you go off to fight chaos/oblivion and lose.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >only great heroes get a good afterlife, normies just become shades in Hades
      Not really that bad if you had descendants who did sacrifices for you. It only sucked if no one remembered you and you had no children.
      >even the lowliest peasant can get into heaven through faith in Christ
      Now you know why the Mystery Cults were immensely popular, and why tons of people joined them.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is a false cope from a Christian.

      Greco-Roman paganism did not require you to be a hero, but advocated for you to fulfill your potential in order to get a good afterlife. You could be righteous, heroic, or simply chosen by the gods themselves, to be allowed into Elysium, which is where the Abrahamic idea of heaven comes from, which originally the israelites only believed in Sheol.

      Also in Christianity, it is made impossible to get into heaven in order to enforce lots of guilt, shame, and obedience into the practitioner, where-as the Greek Gods merely expected you to live to your fullest.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    The same reason Christianity lost to atheism

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      What reason exactly?

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    you'd think christbugs, finding themselves today in a situation not unlike pagans of late antiquity in many ways, would learn something and perhaps even gain some humility realizing the "victory" of a worldview hardly necessarily has to do with its virtue, but they still act so blissfully arrogant on this matter, so much so that it makes witnessing the slow destruction of their world in HD a guilty pleasure

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >finding themselves today in a situation not unlike pagans of late antiquity in many ways
      Christianity today is not even close to being on the same position as paganims was in the Roman empire. Christianity is down on its luck by its own standards, those standards being absolute world domination, but it's still firing on all cylinders if we compare it to Roman paganism, and contrary to it, Christianity has been fighting off multiple foes for a very long time, Roman paganism on the other hand died on its own.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Christianity is down on its luck by its own standards, those standards being absolute world domination
        You'd think christcels would learn to put away their pride and take their situation seriously.
        Christgays one moment are claiming that 99% of other christians are fake and going to hell, but will still claim they're "winning" because billions of people are superficially christian

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >You'd think christcels would learn to put away their pride and take their situation seriously.
          I don't know about you but at least I've noticed that if the numbers of Christians worldwide is decreasing it's not because they've stopped caring, Christian preachers have tried every single conversion strategy under the sun, it's just that nothing seems to work, they've thrown everything at the wall and see if something sticks, but no results. It's not for a lack of trying, that's why you see all this mega cringe Christian content like Christian movies and Christian music and all that shit.
          >Christgays one moment are claiming that 99% of other christians are fake and going to hell,
          The one who usually say this kind of stuff are the ultra mega fundamentalists who don't trust anyone who doesn't go to their very specific church, most Christians in the protestant world at least are in unity with one another since after all they believe that all it takes for people to be saved is to have faith in Jesus.
          >but will still claim they're "winning" because billions of people are superficially christian
          I mean, going by just the numbers, yes, they're still winning, even accounting for all the blows Christianity has received. That shows you that for a very long time Christianity has been on top of the world, the fact that it has taken so much to bring it all down.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >I mean, going by just the numbers, yes, they're still winning, even accounting for all the blows Christianity has received. That shows you that for a very long time Christianity has been on top of the world, the fact that it has taken so much to bring it all down.
            Only a modern thinks that "numbers" are what really count. The majority of people are herd animals who will follow whatever is around them.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The one who usually say this kind of stuff are the ultra mega fundamentalists who don't trust anyone who doesn't go to their very specific church, most Christians in the protestant world at least are in unity with one another since after all they believe that all it takes for people to be saved is to have faith in Jesus.
            I'm definitely not a mega fundamentalist and I pretty much believe that, even if not to quite that extreme. Obviously I lack the capacity to look into another person's heart, but way too many people seem to just be going through the motions or who seem to value hating the right people rather than helping others.

            >No good tree bears bad fruit, nor does a bad tree bear good fruit. Each tree is recognized by its own fruit. People do not pick figs from thornbushes, or grapes from briers. A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in his heart, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in his heart. For the mouth speaks what the heart is full of.
            Luke 6:43-45

  7. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Birth rates.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is there any statistics for that time? I doubt your words

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        the full argument is in the book

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          That is the convertion, look at the last numbers

  8. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Christians tended to organise themselves into centralised autocratic states driven by seethe and coveting what the pagans have. They also thought they are better than pagans because they worship the dead israelite. They were basically like Muslims.

    Pagans were not so centralised. Also when the christians would murder rape the pagans into converting to Christianity, those new christians would then ape out on their neighbours and so on and so forth.

  9. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because Christianity is the Truth, and paganism is fake

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous
      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        How did St Boniface die again?
        I cut down your tre- ACK!

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          And he brought Germany to the Church. You lose

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Now germany is more and more irreligious by the day and the Church is headed by a communist gay

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            And the West is falling, because the West abandoned the Church.

            Again, you lose

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Christians have never really got their head around the concept of cause and effect, and you're clearly no exception.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Surely YOU are the one who has gotten it right, and that's why you're posting it on an anime website

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yep. Everything bad that is happening is a result of people not taking YOUR religion seriously anymore. That's it. If only more people attended mass, we'd be out of this mess :).

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Exactly. See? It's not that hard to recognize what's wrong with the world

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Tell yourself whatever you need to keep your fragile worldview intact

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why do you sound like you're projecting now?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            You couldn't have come up with a lazier, more low effort, trite or meaningless response if you tried.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Struck a nerve, did I?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            is this what "winning" an internet argument looks like?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            You tell me, pal. You sound pretty damaged rn lol

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >he says as he preaches daily on an anime website

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why do Christfedoras have to ruin everything beautiful and spiritual in ancient Germanic culture?

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Anything that venerates strength makes them really insecure. Plus, they like destroying cultures.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Beautiful
          If a horde of smelly, illiterate, ignorant savages is your concept of beautiful, I literally have nothing else to talk to you

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >If a horde of smelly, illiterate, ignorant savages
            Like the rising african christian population?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Or maybe like the multicultural west lmao

            Captcha: GTATND

            Anything that venerates strength makes them really insecure. Plus, they like destroying cultures.

            You lost, therefore you are weak. Sorry, I don't side with weak losers

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >t.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >In this moment, I am euphoric. Not because of any ignorant savage god's blessing. But because, I am enlightened by my lord.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      [...]

      When you realise Christcucks are just the Muslims of yesterday...

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Christianity is the Truth

      Which version? Honestly I think the banjo playing posion drinking snake handling version is the truest chrtianity. Do you want a holy war Heretic? I will throw a rattle snake at you.

  10. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Centralised authority with lots of wealth. Ireland is a perfect case study of the church just plainly saying "convert and get rich quick", then using their authority to expand the new order over the rest of the island.

  11. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Christianity makes humility and humbleness virtues
    >In practice Christians are some of the most arrogant and prideful people on the planet
    What causes this?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's neurotic behavior, same reason a lot of anons subconsciously pick insults that apply to them, or how actual pedos are the most vocal against pedo shit online.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's a total fallacy though.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          You'd know

  12. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Organization

  13. 8 months ago
    Ο Σολιταίρ

    It didn't really
    The biggest single religion on earth is directly derived from the 2 biggest pagan cults of the Late Roman Empire
    Roman* Catholicism (and Orthodox Catholicism) is basically the cults of Sol Invictus and Magna Mater (alongside thousands of minor "saint"-cults) disguised as Christianity

  14. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Organization, appeal to the masses, violence. Eh it could be worse. We could be muslim or some shit

  15. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pagan religion in the Roman empire weakened because it was at its core more of a science than a religion. You do the rituals and formulas correctly, you get good outcomes. You do them incorrectly and you get bad outcomes. It didn't focus much on questions of eternity and the afterlife, the purpose of life, spirituality in general, etc. since it was all about getting practical results in this life. This had less and less appeal over time as the increasingly urbanized and sophisticated population of the Mediterranean began to want more out of spiritualism, and also noticed that the practical outcomes promised by paganism didn't usually have any consistent connection to proper worship. Christianity promised something new and different, and became wildly popular among urbanites as it beat out similar rival cults that sprang up at the same time. Once it captured the younger urban elites, the imperial government followed, and then Christianity's adherents had the power to shitstomp all the rural hicks who still clung to their regional folk traditions. After that the economic and demographic weight of the religion, combined with its intolerance for rival faiths, combined to pull a lot of foreign nations and peoples into its orbit.

  16. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    My theory is Theodosian Autism.
    I'm reading Peter Heather's book right now, on the rise of Christianity, I will get back to you in a few weeks with a real answer.

  17. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Paganism died because it was stupid. Natural phenomenons that can be explained by physics are obviously not caused by a god with a personality that is a member of a large family.

    Monotheism moved god back from natural phenomenons, to the real of the laws of nature. God decrees the laws of the nature, while natural phenomenons happen on their own as a result of such laws.
    God becomes an abstract lawgiver, and only 1

    The closest thing we have to pagans these days, aren't larpagans but green party ecologists, or the kdi Greta. Paganism is a form of nature worship. From earth, to physical phenomena, to animals.

    Monotheism makes nature lesser than man, man is created in the image of God, and everything in nature exists to serve man, even the Sun or the Moon, which aren't worshipped anymore

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Paganism died because it was stupid. Natural phenomenons that can be explained by physics are obviously not caused by a god with a personality that is a member of a large family.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >christians when talking about any other religion
      No wonder the Romans considered them atheists

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >God decrees the laws of the nature, while natural phenomenons happen on their own as a result of such laws
      Actually the God literally acts as the person in the Bible, f.e. in Egypt

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is historical revisionism though, Platonism was stapled onto Christianity later, it wasn't a fundamental aspect of it. The Church fathers were anti-Plato and in the early church you could be accused of heresy if you claimed God wasn't a literal man in the sky.

        The Christian God is/are a person, but he is the designer of the laws of the universe, and the sustainer of its material existence.
        The phenomenons don't happen directly because of the Christian God. They are a result of his laws. Humans are free, and natural phenomenons can be explained, studied and predicted from the laws of God.
        When God directly causes some effect that can be perceived in the world, it's a miracle, something which goes against what can normally be predicted to happen according to the laws of nature and physics. Something which can't be explained.

        Modern pagans (larpagans) are atheists, because they don't really believe Zeus or Thor cause the thunders that land on building lightingrods. They know it's just natural phonemona.

        2500 years ago there were people who really thought a divine creature called Zeus or Hadad caused thunder.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Modern pagans (larpagans) are atheists, because they don't really believe Zeus or Thor cause the thunders that land on building lightingrods. They know it's just natural phonemona.
          By this logic most Christians are atheists too and the rest of the cope in your post is not a compelling argument otherwise. When Christians engage with the natural world, they either assign God some causal role farther back in the chain of events (we may now know that God doesn't make the sun rise but we can cope by ignoring astrophysics and believing that God magicked the sun itself into place) or they outright reject anything that challenges their beliefs, such as theories of evolution or a fossil record proving that the world is older than a few thousand years.

          There's no reason why pagans couldn't use the exact same cope and say that even if we know the physical processes that cause lightning, Thor is still responsible behind the scenes. You should try holding your own beliefs to the same standards of evidence as you do the beliefs of pagans; you might learn something.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is historical revisionism though, Platonism was stapled onto Christianity later, it wasn't a fundamental aspect of it. The Church fathers were anti-Plato and in the early church you could be accused of heresy if you claimed God wasn't a literal man in the sky.

  18. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Define paganism and the time frame in particular you want us to focus on?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      The traditional European religions

      Christianization of Europe

  19. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just as darkness flees before the light, truth erases falsehood.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      it would be hilarious if it wasnt so moronic that morons like this have zero sense of irony when saying something this moronic

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Seething

  20. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why did paganism lose to Christianity?
    Sam way Christianity is losing to Progressivism. Christians are the new pagans. The urban centers are Progressive now, just how Christianity began as an urban revolutionary movement, so too will it die by one.

    How's it taste, pagan?

  21. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Previous Christian here... Sincerely converting to Norse paganism...

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why, exactly? Neither are true.

  22. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    because christcuckery is a religion for idiots and most people are idiots. that and it was forced on the populous most likely by paid ~~*agents*~~ like Justinian who killed and tortured pagans but oddly had no problem with israelites, allowed israelites to be excused from public service and allowed them to monopolize the shylock market

  23. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on which area of the world we are talking about. In some cases it was spread with fire and sword (like Baltic crusades) and in case of Lithuania it converted for political reasons (Teutonic pressure and a need to ally with Poland). Not that peasantry actually converted that fast, there were still pagan practices around few hundred years later, as Jesuits have reported.
    Roman empire is a bit different case because you get both political enforcement but also willing conversions.

  24. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    paganism is for troons and morons

  25. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read Augustine's 'City of God', it's largely a defense of Christianity against Roman paganism while the latter was still commonly practiced

    tl;dr, pagan religions grow organically, but as a result are more like a jumbled accumulation of random traditions than a religion as we understand it. So when something structured, organised and with genuine philosophical thought underpinning it (Christianity) came along it just swept paganism away.

    Neoplatonism did form some kind of backbone to the pagan worldview but it helped Christianity more in the long run.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      most of the "genuine philosophical thought" are various copes about how the gospels are so contradictory and silly though

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Which is understandable given that they were
        >drawn from oral tradition
        >written minimum 30 years after the fact
        >probably from different traditions

        However this philosophical seething then gave way to Thomism which provided a well thought-out explanation for everything

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >christianity won purely on merits because it was an objectively superior philosophical system
      It sounds nice but how do you reconcile this with all the instances of legal and violent repression of pagans? It's easy to look back centuries after the fact and say, "Oh yeah we totally won because of our superior philosophical thought!" while ignoring all of the wars and massacres that were needed before Christianity became the dominant religion.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        It succeeded *in Rome* because of this, i.e. among the educated classes (and among the poor obviously)

        Then it became the imperial religion and social factors took over. People want to emulate the powerful far more than they want to listen to arguments.

        To paraphrase Augustine though, if the pagan gods were so great why did they let their worship vanish in favour of Christianity? Why didn't the war gods lead the pagans to victory?

        >muh wars

        Not everywhere- the conversion of Ireland is generally thought to have occurred peacefully, for example

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          I feel like I'm having to ask this question over and over in this thread, but once again: are you just ignorant of the early spread of Christianity or are you just being dishonest?

          >It succeeded *in Rome* because of this
          >Then it became the imperial religion and social factors took over.
          Just an outright lie, and for what purpose? Aside from the continual escalation of Roman legal efforts to suppressed indigenous religions in conquered provinces, there are countless instances of non-Roman Christians violently converting pagans. A few of the more notable accounts:

          >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxon_Wars
          >The Saxon Wars were the campaigns and insurrections of the thirty-three years from 772, when Charlemagne first entered Saxony with the intent to conquer, to 804, when the last rebellion of tribesmen was defeated. In all, 18 campaigns were fought, primarily in what is now northern Germany. They resulted in the incorporation of Saxony into the Frankish realm and their forcible conversion from Germanic paganism to Christianity.
          This is the same Charlemagne who famously executed 4,500 pagans at the massacre of Verden, and then celebrated by holding a mass.

          >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Wight
          >During the Early Middle Ages, the island was settled by Jutes as the pagan kingdom of the Wihtwara under King Arwald. In 685, it was invaded by King Cædwalla of Wessex, who tried to replace the inhabitants with his followers. In 686, Arwald was defeated, and the island became the last part of English lands to be converted to Christianity.

          >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_crusades
          >The Northern Crusades or Baltic Crusades were Christian colonization and Christianization campaigns undertaken by Catholic Christian military orders and kingdoms, primarily against the pagan[citation needed] Baltic, Finnic and West Slavic peoples around the southern and eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, and also against Orthodox Christian Slavs.

  26. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because most people couldn't even read the latin shit shit. Especially in North Europe. They lied about christianity to the Germaniscs and said christ was heroic and like Wotan/Odin. They used lies and deception. They paganized christianity. on and on.

  27. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    It didn't. Paganism is a blood based religion. The Gods are in the blood. As long as there are white people, there are the Gods, see pic.

  28. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    See pic OP, from the founder of the Asatru Folk Assembly. Christianity is dying amongst white people. It was a blip.

  29. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why did paganism lose to Christianity?
    Money

  30. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    For the same reason current tradtions are lossing to wokism state power baking it. Chrtianity at one time was a radical subversive relgion in the Roman Empire. It one the culture war against tradtional polytheism just as the cult of woke is winning the culture wars now. Once tthe popes replaced the function of the ceasers they could bind all the other tribes and countries too it.

  31. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >For I am a wrathful god (Nahum 1:2-8)
    >I am a jealous god (Exodus 34:14)
    >You are allowed to have slaves and beat them to near-death (Ephesians 6:5–8)
    >You should allow guests in your home to rape your virginal daughter (Exodus 21:1-11)
    >Songs of Praise is a section dedicated entirely to pillaging, raping, destroying, and decimating civilizations that have wronged the israelites (Isaiah 12-16)
    >You cannot love God unless you hate your family (Luke 14:26)
    >If you worship a different god, you shall be murdered (Kings 10:18-27)
    >If you've never even heard of Jesus Christ or Christianity you will be cast out of heaven for eternity (Romans 1:20)
    >The israelites are allowed to kill and destroy others villages and to take their virginal daughters and forced them to be their wives (Judges 21)
    >The israelites are allowed to kill entire cities of men, women, and children and take their belongings and loot for themselves (Deuteronomy 3)
    >As part of a punishment for rebelling against god, murdering infants is a suitable punishment (Hosea 13:16)
    >In fact, killing the infants of your religious enemies as a whole is completely justified (Psalms 137:9)

  32. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Paganism/polytheism is the natural development of ancestor worship, when a society gets too big to remember all the specific legendary bloodlines. It just melds into a spiritual abstraction, where some people represent some natural phenomena, and they’re associated with some personal attributes. When people worship to these deities, they’re invariably viewing themselves as inferior supplicants to their god, and they’re trying to incentivize him with sacrifice and ritual to help them out. It’s inherently transactional, and there’s no morality in it; the most you get out of it is social acceptance.

    Christianity won out because it carried the ancient israeli take on universal morality to the next level; while israelites, originally yahwists, were henotheists that wanted to keep their spirituality to themselves, Jesus (as a myth or as a historical figure) was able to serve as a demonstration of that universal morality. Everyone would want to consider themselves a morally upright person, so when they got exposed to an actual moral system, their absentee gods couldn’t compete

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Paganism/polytheism is the natural development of ancestor worship, when a society gets too big to remember all the specific legendary bloodlines.
      there is nothing in archeology or anthropology that supports this meme

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Paganism/polytheism is the natural development of ancestor worship, when a society gets too big to remember all the specific legendary bloodlines.
      there is nothing in archeology or anthropology that supports this meme

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4958132/

  33. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Damn Apollo looks like THAT

  34. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    what's the bigger number couple hundred or one

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