Old Style New Pope

Suppose for the sake of argument that a new Pope of the Roman Catholic Church wants to roll everything back to around the era of Emperor Charlemagne's reign. Could one Pope be capable of getting close to that, or would it take a succession of papacies to arrive at something like the state of the church circa early 800s AD? What would the modern church even look like by the logical conclusion of such a goal? What did the church actually look like during Carolingian times?

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  1. 6 months ago
    JWanon

    >Open bible
    >Ctrl+f
    >"pope"
    >0 results

    Really makes you think

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >CTRL+F
      >WATCHTOWER
      >0 RESULTS

      REALLY MAKES YOU THINK

      • 6 months ago
        JWanon

        >Search results for: watchtower
        >20 verses found

        https://biblescan.com/search.php?q=watchtower

        lol

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Two can play at that game.
          >pope, (Latin papa, from Greek pappas, “father”),

          https://biblescan.com/search.php?q=father

          BOOOOOOOM!

  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    No it's not possible, it would be too big a change and an obviously stupid one. The average priest would have no education, they would be allowed to marry, and Communion would only be received once a year on Easter. Also of course the mass would be in Latin and there would be various rites in different countries. Some bishops would be appointed by local secular authorities and not by the Pope.

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Possible but immeasurably difficult and ultimately to be undone by the next pope

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    why would a pope do that? the pope literally had less powers, was less independent and wasnt even infallible back then

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      To return to the glorious era of Christendom?

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        you think those were the 800s?

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          not OP but unironically y e s

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Charlemagne was arguably the most powerful Catholic ruler.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            But there were no crusades.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            *Charles V

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Imagine the popes would prefer high middle ages to early, when they're making emperors beg them for forgiveness in the snow and such. Carolingian-era popes were all but imperial puppets.

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes just make a vatican council 3

  6. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    You're chasing the wrong dream anon, or at least half of a dream. In order for a retvrn to tradition to be feasible in Europe, an emperor is needed. The Staufer dynasty had the right idea but too many unfortunate events led to its downfall and it only got worse. Charles V had some potential and he did try, but by then Christendom had splintered into several warring or mutually hostile factions.

  7. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What did the church actually look like during Carolingian times?
    Lutheranism

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Lutherism is moronic for its 5 solas, and hostility toward monasticism
      Not at all what the church looked like

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      More like Eastern Orthodoxy that wasn't particularly so taken by a fixation upon images, yet, but was not institutionally iconoclastic, either. Refer to the Council of Frankfurt.

  8. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    la sede está vacante

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is correct

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        How can Rome fall into apostasy when the Pope can't error as per vatican 1

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's not what infallibility means...

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            You never read vatican 1 then because the Pope not being able to error and ex cathedra statements are two separate things

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            a pope pretending to be a pope isn't actually a pope

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Vatican one disagrees

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Norvus Ordo is invalid and so is the new rite of ordination.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Neither of which have anything to do with Vatican 1

  9. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    During Carolingian times the position of pope was much lower than it was after 11th century reforms. This is one of the things people tend to misunderstand, while Charlemagne used the Pope as a sort of propaganda tool, once the central power of his empire degraded papal reality turned into being part of internal Roman mafia style familial disputes and it was only a succession of several popes with extreme intent on reform when the assertive and pan-catholic influencing papacy was born.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Was the Pope just the Bishop of Rome, more or less equal to other bishops? Or, was he already thought of in terms of "His Holiness?"

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        By that point, the Pope was already referred to as such, by Pope/Papa. You have to go back further, when they were merely a Bishop, albeit, slightly elevated by the prestige of overseeing Rome, and the Apostle Peter's added clout to the role.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Papa means father, they were priests they were always referred to as Pope

  10. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    It might be possible... to get things back to the way they were during the 1960s, when Vatican II was just new. Vatican II and Vatican I before it would necessarily restrict any possible backtracking that could be done for the church as a whole.

  11. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone else want to go back even future, to the early church fathers?

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