I'm looking for books that investigate the future of religion, but not in a quantitative way.

I'm looking for books that investigate the future of religion, but not in a quantitative way. So many books either investigate how religion evolved through history, but almost no authors predict how it will evolve in the future.(other than the Marxist delusion that it will simply disappear). At the very best it's just some statistics lumped together about how religion X will grow so much, while religion Y will stagnate in terms of numbers, etc.

I stumbled upon this after reading Spengler, because he really was the only one to make any predictions on how religion in the West would be forced to assimilate elements of other religions.

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dune comes to mind, it's by far the most famous example of speculative religion. Canticle for Leibowitz is another classic of social science fiction for similar reasons. Anathem by Neal Stephenson is also famous but it's not nearly as good as the other two titles, but it might be worth reading just to get imaginative juices flowing (I will contend that I did mildly enjoy reading it). It might also help to familiarize yourself with psychoanalysis that marries spirituality and typology to systematic understandings of the psyche. Jung is good for that, also look into Mircea Eliade.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      I should get into Dune, i do think speculative religion is pretty fascinating (never realized that term).
      I just find it unfortunate that they cast Zendaya, Timothy Chalamet and Florence Pudgy in the movie

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Was gonna post this, dangerously based

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bump, I am convinced we are in our late antiquity but still not sure what our “next” Christmas is. I don’t think wokeness has a future. Don’t think it’s Santa Muerte even though it’s on the periphery and her followers say she gives results.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Next Christianity, phone posting.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Christianity has an answer for every movement and epoch thrown at it. It deals with them as they come. Picrel is one postmodernism. But most of all, it won't go away because people of all types will always encounter the Holy Spirit. Something nobody can counter. Even those who try to take advantage and redefine it get thwarted and can't understand it in the end.
      >The Kingdom of God does not come when people are spying on it, nor will they say, ‘Be- hold, it is here,’ or ‘there;’ for the Kingdom of God is inside you.”-Luke 17:20-21

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, I have been thinking about Abram called out of Ur and also his encounter with Melchizedek. God gives assurances throughout the OT that he will preserve a remnant, reading Jeremiah now and even there He says just deal with your captivity, I will bring some of you back.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, I have been thinking about Abram called out of Ur and also his encounter with Melchizedek. God gives assurances throughout the OT that he will preserve a remnant, reading Jeremiah now and even there He says just deal with your captivity, I will bring some of you back.

        This is just cope that Christianity is in terminal decline but technically "survives" as a religion because of certain orthodox pockets.
        It's like saying Zoroastrianism never declined because it persisted in Persia and India to this day

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Over here the protestants are rapidly turning into atheists, and while the catholics are nominally doing better only a minority are confident that God exists.
        To me it looks like it's going away.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Protestants have always had just one degree of separation from atheism, and that's faith. If that falters (and it does so easily), there's nothing to prevent them from falling into an abyss of godlessness.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            So what's your view on religion without faith?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not saying faith isn't required, but if you strip away rituals, a religious hierarchy and practice, then you are not left with much

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Protestants have always had just one degree of separation from atheism, and that's faith. If that falters (and it does so easily), there's nothing to prevent them from falling into an abyss of godlessness.

            I've come to believe this as well.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >the future of religion
    It has no future, or at least the religions of the future will not go by the name "religion"
    The standardization of religion into organized institutions hinders the creative impulse to develop new religions
    Those who attempt to create new religions are pre-emptively labeled cultists

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      There are different currents and they eventually ossify into different traditions. Some speculate that this next round will be less centralized or institutional based on shifting from piscean/neptunian to aquarian/urantian. You could still have holy rollers under those different conditions.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Religion will have a future - a very recognizable one. The world lacks transcendence, while man needs it. He needs stability and truth. While little brief moments of dopamine hits, fleeting feelings of love, current thing, and the Book of the Month aren't going to take them there.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Eastern religion and spirituality. Much older and time tested than Christianity. Also much healthier mentally

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rene guenon

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Idk if there exists books which do that (im sure they do) and how well they do it but what i recommend you is to make your own predictions. Now, you need information, else your predictions would be pretty much useless and, if they are true, it is by chance. How do you adquire said knowledge? By reading religious books, books about religion, sociology, psycology et cetera and by observing the world around you

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    THE STATE WILL BECOME THE NEW RELIGION

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      The state & religion were historically undivided; one and the same.
      So if the state did become a religion it would arguably be a return to our pre-secular past

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I feel like the major reason for religious decline is the inability to answer the Problem of Evil, especially in a world where information now flows so freely that we can see the atrocities of the entire world in vivid detail. I think that any religion that wishes to survive could best just sidestep it, like the Dharmic religions do, which see evil as a causal reality, not something that has to exist with the approval of a benevolent omnipotent deity.

    What i am also wondering about is the tension between religion's tendency to 'escape' in another world, and modern man's desire to improve the current world. You can't have a religion that is completely ontologically materialistic.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting post, I actually think the problem of evil is more a problem precisely because of how prosperous and sheltered we are from realities like war. We can see more of it on a screen but compared to Ancient Socities we conceptualize it more as a problem because we aren't as immersed in conflict, so we are more sensitive or averse to violence.
      Whereas in medieval socities for example it was normal to see executions conducted in public view, and people butchering animals out in the street.
      There was still the problem of evil back then, how we could synthesize the reality of suffering with a good creator, but people were far more likely to just unthinkingly accept suffering as their lot in life, either as fated or due to somehow invoking the wrath of God.
      Increased standards of living have made it a problem.
      >What i am also wondering about is the tension between religion's tendency to 'escape' in another world, and modern man's desire to improve the current world. You can't have a religion that is completely ontologically materialistic.
      Yes this is an interesting tension. Perhaps religion can somewhat get around that tension through millenarist beliefs--i.e the idea that there is a coming apocalypse which will usher im a utopia on earth.
      Or another possibility for a future religion is that science/tech will become a religion, a kind of sci fi or transhumanist cult of worshipping the manipulation lf nature for our own ends.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        The biggest obstacle to the creation of new religions is globalism and the internet.
        In order for a religion to be created it needs some degree of separation, a somewhat strict policing of in v.s out.
        In today's globalised world, doctrinal conformity becomes harder to police. You can hop online and immediately be exposed to hundreds of outside p.o.v

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not sure if the tension can actually be relieved, it's found in pretty much every religion. It's why Nietzsche detested many of them, because they fundamentally sought to evade the actual real world by depicting it as inferior to the hereafter in the Abrahamic religions, or the world-as-dream in the Dharmic ones. It's actually pretty blatant in the Buddhist tradition, where before the Buddha's birth he was predicted to either be a great and just king, or a Buddha. This dichotomy spells it out that you cannot achieve both spiritual enlightenment and rule in a secular sense.

        The way i see it, if a religion wants to make people more concerned with improving the world, then the best it can do is to incorporate reincarnation within its ethics, as this will at least force people to improve the world (they're going to return to it, after all). But even then you'll need a higher realm to reincarnate into as well, because only rebirth into this world will just make your religion regress to materialism. My best bet is some form of Hinduism, but more monotheistic, because monotheistic religions are generally much more successful in proselytization.

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Disregard all the other shit recommended and just read this. No other book like it ever published

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Promising premise, but
      >Kenneth Earl Wilber II (born January 31, 1949) is an American writer on transpersonal psychology and his own integral theory, a four-quadrant grid which suggests the synthesis of all human knowledge and experience.
      HMMMMMMMMMMM

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Throw stones all you want. Ken wilber is one of the greatest thinkers of our time. He builds off of many well respected developmental psychology models

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          How does he "build" on them?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Throw stones all you want. Ken wilber is one of the greatest thinkers of our time. He builds off of many well respected developmental psychology models

      Alright then, what's so good about the book?

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pic related wrote on it, i have no idea how i found the book.
    It's very chuddy, which you would not expect from the title or the author, so if that's not your cup of tea, be warned.

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hyperion has a lot of religious themes and the templars are a cool idea.

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