How do I get into biblical scholarship/bible studies as a complete newb?

How do I get into biblical scholarship/bible studies as a complete newb?

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go to a church. There is like a 100% possibility that there is a Bible study there.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      My moms church only has women’s and couple groups, no men’s group

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the Bible.

    Seriously though it depends what you mean. Do you mean academically or learning more as a hobby?
    Yale has whole lecture series devoted to the old and new testement posted online I found helpful first learning about the field, and Bart Ehrman posts a lot of good content on his channel as well.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      More as a hobby, but I want something academic and less devotional/denominational.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Bart Ehrman's good, and I've found that Joel Baden writes good books for laymen on the subject.
        I just finished reading The Composition of the Pentateuch by Baden, which is about the Documentary Hypothesis.
        He does a good job of breaking down why academics believe there are multiple sources, and explains in a fairly common sense, easy to understand way how scholar's delineate the different sources in the text.

        Mark Smith's Early History of God is mandatory reading imo, but it is quite a bit more difficult to read.

        The Price of Monotheism by Jan Assman is another good book if you're interested in Akhenaten's potential connection to the Yahwist movement.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Ehrman is an atheist and a very careless hermeneutician
          Also
          >Assman
          Lol

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Start reading it
    King James Version.
    Whatever you think is “inaccurate” in the KJV is clarified in a google search, and is worth the beautiful language.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      The KJV is good literature, but it is definitely not what you want to read if you're trying to learn more about secular scholarship regarding the Bible.

      • 5 months ago
        Ο Σολιταίρ

        >secular scholarship regarding the Bible.
        This is found outside the Bible.
        So it doesn't make much of a difference.
        The KJV is a better translation than any other English version (gasp).
        Any differences which pertain to secular scholarship are well known and don't require you to read NIV goyslop.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >secular scholarship regarding the Bible.
          >This is found outside the Bible.
          Yes, commentary on the Bible and textual criticism of biblical manuscripts is in fact outside of the Bible.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Also obtain a copy of Strong's Concordance.
    > for every word in OT + NT
    > definition of word, origin
    > reference to every use of the word in the bible
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strong%27s_Concordance

    (you can also download the ESword program for free, which contains various version of the bible + strongs + commentary)

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Find yourself a copy of the LXX. It's the oldest version of the bible to survive antiquity.

    Read it. Then ask a priest some questions about it, because you're nearly guaranteed to not get it at first.

    It really is that simple.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >It's the oldest version of the bible to survive antiquity.
      >what is the DSS

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Forgeries.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Only those bought by gullible American evangelicals who think they can just pay their way to success.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      OP here, this does bring me another question.
      Which of the biblical languages should I learn first?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Greek would also be the easiest having the greatest relation to other Western languages and has the benefit of having the aforementioned testament in a translation from antiquity. Aside from the issue with a minority of textual differences, the Hebrew of the OT still sounds the most optimal for it grammatically and lyrically.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    a through study of the new testament first requires extensive knowledge of the roman republic and subsequent empire

    a through study of the old testament first requires extensive knowledge of the greeks, hellenic period and early roman kingdom

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    A platform with tools such as this is what pretty much induced me into it.

    https://biblehub.com/text/matthew/1-1.htm

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    You might want to watch this playlist before you go to bible collage:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJDJ1utc3QdpwdRDvqMhE4xk2P77UgJdC

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Most of his scholarly works is being over turned by CBGM.
    He's popular works are only influential for people who never studied outside of atheist circles & Islamic Dawah.
    For example he famously says that there are more variant than there are verses in bible. Sounds impressive until you actually know what they are. most of them are misspellings and we know they
    re misspellings because of the work done like CBGM.
    He's understandings of Christian theology and old testament are absolutely abominable, especially on the Trinity. He keeps mistaking it for a certain heresy.

    The fact of the matter is once Erhman dies his attribution with society is only matter to those who call others "fanatical stooge" for disagreeing with them.

  10. 5 months ago
    Dirk

    Read a systematic theology

    • 5 months ago
      Dirk

      Actually, read these instead of a single systematic theology
      https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/essays/

      The series is called concise theology
      >The idea was to produce a series of well-informed yet popularly accessible, brief essays (target 1,500 to 2,500 words each) that collectively cover the breadth of Systematic Theology
      Pick and choose what you're interested in
      You could also watch bible project videos

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