How do Dharmic religions justify killing?

How do Dharmic religions justify killing? I know Buddhism and especially Jainism forbid it outright, but how do Hinduism and Sikhism justify killing and war when there's a negative karmic consequence associated with it? Especially interested in Sikhism cause i know very little about it

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  1. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    pls Oyish

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      no one here actually cares about discussing non-abrahamic religion unless its related to the discussion of abrahamic religion. You should know this by now

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Well can you at least suggest some literature to look into?

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sikhism is sort-of Abrahamic

  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know much about the others but am a buddhist there's only one case (that I can think of) in which the buddha himself actually advised to do something that causes negative karma - he advised lay practitioners to have sex even though sex is karmically negative because he believed they would accrue a greater amount of negative karma (and would pollute their mind) if they tried to suppress/overcome sexual desire - some later zen teachers also allowed new monks to go to brothels because they saw severing the red thread as so difficult

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Hinduism and Sikhism
    Killing is part of the dharma, duh.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      But how do they incorporate it, and what justification is there for it being part of the dharma when jainism and buddhism reject it?

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Buddhism and Jainism hold that killing is against the dharma most of the time because you're forcibly terminating a life and causing it to be reborn. By contrast, Hinduism and Sikhism both hold that there's a thing called "dharma" and sometimes you have to kill (in a specific manner) those who are outside of it. Buddhism and Jainism hold that dharma isn't a moral thing but rather a background fact of the universe (think gravity). Thus, there are cases where killing is actually within dharma, namely killing those outside of it or those opposed to it.

        It should be noted that Buddhists are against KILLING, not violence. A Buddhist monk can totally defend himself up to the point of killing, that's not a problem (he's not supposed to do so if he's attached to his own life, but he can absolutely defend someone else's life up to the point of killing).

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Buddhism and Jainism hold that killing is against the dharma most of the time because you're forcibly terminating a life and causing it to be reborn
          If that were the reason, then killing a buddha or an arhat would not be a 'sin', but they are seen as some of the most heinous crimes one can commit.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          In Sikhism specifically it's justified by being the Guru's hukam (ie: gods will). If something dies or is killed, it was meant to happen. Many times God in sikhism in invoked as Mahakala, which denotes destruction or death. Weapons like guns, swords, spears, ect. are refered to as God's Shakti, or God's power manifest. The sword has the power to kill, destroy, or protect. If one dies, all must die eventually. So is basically right.

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    The idea is that there is more merit in protecting something than in the damage caused by it. Senseless violence would be negative karma, but a defensive war isn't necessarily, and if an offensive war is a net benefit then it isn't either. For example, invading Muslims and banning halal slaughter is probably good karma overall, and the government of Myanmar is righteously upholding the dharma.

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Killing has no negative karmic consequence if you kill to protect self, family, land, innocent from destruction.

    Unless person you kill holds a grudge against u

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Killing has no negative karmic consequence
      yes it does

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Fair enough

  6. 6 months ago
    Radiochan

    buddhists can be very warlike lol. Thailland is far from peaceful and so isn't Myanmar or Tibet.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah but that's coincidental, something even against their religion.
      Same with how muslim countries can drink alcohol; it's not supported theologically

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >buddhist smoke cigarettes therefore Buddhism supports cigarette smoking

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