>god jobs to horse carts

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  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    It doesn't say that

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      It literally does tho? Read your Bible

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you check the good translations, you will find that there are italicized words, indicating that they were inserted by the translators and aren't actually in the text.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Cope #2. If you apologists want to be taken seriously, you really ought to have an ecumenical council to draft up the first systematic copeology.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            That's how it's literally written in the Hebrew moron

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It was not translated into Hebrew until the 9th century AD. It is obviously an attempted retcon.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cope

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Christcucks don't even read their own book.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Samegay

        The original text doesn't use he, moron. [...]

        There's also actually no "the inhabitants" and no "could".

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Samegay
          You wish Black person

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >christcucks
      >not reading the bible

      Name a more iconic pairing.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's funny since they love to say atheist are the ones that actually didn't read it.

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous
  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    'He' refers to Judah. Are you illiterate?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Are you? Name one other instance in the Bible where an entire nation is called "he". Hardmode: no poetry.

      • 7 months ago
        Dirk

        “But his father refused and said, “I know, my son, I know. He also shall become a people, and he also shall be great. Nevertheless, his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his offspring shall become a multitude of nations.”” (Gen 48:19, ESV)

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Its literally talking about Esau, moron.

          • 7 months ago
            Dirk

            ..ok?

            He (person) shall become a people, and he (the people/nation) shall be great
            am - a people, nation
            https://biblehub.com/hebrew/5971.htm

            Do you concede the point?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            I concede that you are a moron once again. Who is the "he" being refered to in Judges? What person is this referencing? Also that reading is a stretch. It is clearly just saying Esau's legacy will be great.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            The original text doesn't use he, moron.

            There is in fact no description of God failing there at all. The Judahites conquered the hill country with the aid of God, but no aid from God is referred to in their attempt to drive out the inhabitants of the lowlands.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, that is Cope 3. You guys need to get behind that one. Probably bullshit but I am too lazy to check it for myself.

          • 7 months ago
            Dirk

            Are you an illiterate or something?
            The nation of Esau is Edom, the edomites. This passage says "he" and "people(nation)" in the same phrase, thus a nation is referred to as "he" in reference to their patriarch.

            Do you concede the point? You specifically asked for an example of this.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Are you an illiterate or something?

            No not redeem the irony sar!

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Don't remember where because I haven't read it for years but I read the Bible cover to cover when I was younger. There are many verses throughout Joshua-2 Kings where one of the tribes of Israel is referred to as 'he'. Also why no poetry? Because you know there are psalms which also refer to a tribe as 'he'?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >The Lord was with Judah, who/which took....
      VS
      >The Lord was with Judah, and he took...

      Makes you wonder what 'additional information' 'and' is providing to the subject here.

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is in fact no description of God failing there at all. The Judahites conquered the hill country with the aid of God, but no aid from God is referred to in their attempt to drive out the inhabitants of the lowlands.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cope #3

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Drives out walkingcels with help of god
      >Can't drive out chariotchads even tho god is still helping them

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Can't
        It doesn't say that.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Then what does it say? Let me guess

          "And lo Gigachadweh drave out the soichariotcucks from the plain but Judah wouldn't take the land because they thought they saw giants, so he put the israelite bastids back in the walking simulator for another 40 years"

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            You got it

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          If have a goal that is not accomplished despite your full efforts, then you can't accomplish the goal.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >despite your full efforts
            That isn't in the text frend.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you're going to a battle to death it's only logical that you're giving your full effort.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            They were half assing it, leaning on God. That's why he punished them with defeat.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            1 Kings 8:61
            >Let your heart therefore be wholly devoted to the Lord our God, to walk in His statutes and to keep His commandments, as at this day.”
            Depending on god is a good thing according to your book

            uhh not really; have you heard of "retreating" before?

            >W-we didn't actually lose to chariots we just had to retreat because they were to strong.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            That's about submitting your will, not being lazy.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Cope harder. Faith in god allegedly allowed people to walk on water and part the red sea. But I guess that defeating IRON chariots is a little bit harder and to much for magic israelite.

            Anon was wrong, they half-assed it by not having confidence in God.

            But they were confident enough to defeat the chariotless- subhumans up in the mountains. If anything this victory should made them bolder and more faithful. But I guess that even this bonus was not big enough to defeat the mighty chariotchads on plains. After all having IRON chariots is substantiall bost in forces to the almighty and maybe even a little to much. 😉

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >If anything this victory should made them bolder and more faithful.
            But they didn't become bolder, because they feared men more than God, and therefore didn't try to drive out the charioteers.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It clearly states that they couldn't

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            There's no could, it just says they didn't. The word means drive out in general.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Look at

            There is in fact no description of God failing there at all. The Judahites conquered the hill country with the aid of God, but no aid from God is referred to in their attempt to drive out the inhabitants of the lowlands.

            and

            https://i.imgur.com/3sERSNm.png

            >god jobs to horse carts

            and stop lying to yourself. The magic israelite is not omnipotent nor omniscient even in your retarted iron age book.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It's funny since they love to say atheist are the ones that actually didn't read it.

            Samegay
            Read Joshua 17:16 to 18 which takes place before Judges 1:19
            Then read Judges 4
            >the Israelites are afraid of the iron chariots
            >the prophet Joshua tells them to have faith and they will win
            >Judah fails because he isn't able to overcome his fear
            >the Israelites under the pious leadership of Barak end up defeating the charioteers
            >the king of the charioteers pathetically dies to a woman
            >God wins

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Anon was wrong, they half-assed it by not having confidence in God.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Nice headcanon

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            uhh not really; have you heard of "retreating" before?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Retreating isn't something which requires full effort
            >Having your back to the enemy is a walk in the park
            wew

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >God gave them the power to do something easy
      >...and then withheld it when the next thing was hard
      The way I read it, it seems like God isn't actually doing anything at all.

      And why split up the aid package like this anyway? In like the next passage, God comes thundering at them basically saying "I told you guys to take the plains AND the hill country as a bundle deal, and you've failed, thereby disobeying me. Since you aren't able to defeat the iron chariots, I refuse to help you [defeat the iron chariots]." Never mind that this is moronic. If they were displeasing God like he said, why the heck was he "with them" on the plains? Unless it's all a trick right

      people wrote this down without the self-awareness that they're describing a low-cunning manipulative curtain-wizard, who conveniently decides what kind of moral support people deserve AFTER things shake out, and he has to either save face or bask in unearned gratitude. What an absolute tool

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Because Judah wasn't the chosen one. The prophecy was that the sons of Joseph would destroy the iron chariots. You can complain about fate, but that doesn't mean you can escape it.

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >He
    Why would you lie when the actual word is "they"? The subject is the people who couldn't overcome, not God. Just because God is with you doesn't make you superhuman. You still experience losses.

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can sense how frantic Christians are with this one because no apologia was pre-written for them. Just winging it without the help of what are essentially Bible lawyers

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Bible lawyers
      That's what the church is about
      Marxists do the same thing squabbling over lenin stalin mao etc
      They're the same

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's extremely obvious it's just a retelling of history, that Israel got mogged because they beelined faith shit and didn't explore the bottom of the tech tree.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, but if magic israelite existed then he would help the israelites defeated the chariotchads.

  8. 7 months ago
    Ο Σολιταίρ

    The Lord was with Judah*, and he(Judah) took possession of the hill country
    but he(Judah) could not drive out the inhabitants of the plain because they had chariots of iron

    You still can be incredulous and doubt God.
    >lol how could God help Judah w/ the hill country but not the plain????
    But don't act like you're reading the text correctly.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      "The Lord" is the subject of the sentence.

      Elipsis is used to avoid repeating the subject.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is gold lmao, it uses a singular pronoun. Even if it didn’t you’re reading that as if god wasn’t there, when the reason given for the loss is that they had iron chariots, not that god wasn’t in the next battle
      Don’t you stop and think (holy shit this might actually be mythology.) that doesn’t cross your mind?

      • 7 months ago
        Ο Σολιταίρ

        God didnt take possession of the hill country, Judah did.
        Are you not understanding that?
        There's two males in the sentence, The Lord, and Judah, gramatically. "He" could refer to either one, and it makes far more sense that "he" is Judah.
        Very very often a tribe is referred to as the given name of its founder in the masculine singular.

        >Don’t you stop and think (holy shit this might actually be mythology.)
        I already said you can think that. Only that gramatically you're wrong.

    • 7 months ago
      Dirk

      The spammer doesn't get the concept that the nation is named for the patriarch

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Who were these iron chariots? Assyrians?

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >No references
    >ignores larger reason why Judah lost at that time
    >ignores iron chariots not being an issue in Judges chapter 4.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >ignores iron chariots not being an issue in Judges chapter 4
      God trained and was more confident

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    'He' refers to Judah not God

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Doesn't matter he got gods help but the IRON chariots were too much for the god

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Judah not God

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah juda got Gods help but that simply wasn't enough to deafet IRON CHARIOTS

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            God wasn't helping Judah you are moronic

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            So the bible lied?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            No you are lying

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            I didn't make the claim that god lost to iron chariots. That's the bible's claim.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Judah lost to iron chariots

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Was god with judah, or did the bible lie?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He was with Judah in the hill country.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Was god with judah, or did the bible lie?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He was with Judah in the hill country.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            And in the plains, or was the bible fallible after all.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He was with Judah in the hill country
            He wasn't with Judah in the plains

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            The bible doesn't clarify that god was with judah in the hill country but not in the plains. It simply states that god was with judah.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            In the hill country

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            And the plains

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Nope

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The bible lied.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It did not. He wasn't with Judah in the plain.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            The bible doesn't say that.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It doesn't not say that.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes it doesn't.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, it doesn't not.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            How do you know god was with judah in the hill country?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because he won

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            And winning was impossible without god?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            God decides winners and losers

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            All the most convincing claims and stances need to be axiomatically taken as fact and never questioned. You Christians really are cult members

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Was god with the iron chariots against judah, or is winning possible without god?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He wasn't with Judah because he decided that he shouldn't win in the plain. You can't win if God decided that you should lose. He doesn't have to be with iron chariots, just not with Judah.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >He doesn't have to be with iron chariots, just not with Judah.
            If god doesn't have to be with the iron chariots to decide they will win, how do you know god was with judah in the hill country?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because their winning there was his decision

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            But that doesn't necessarily mean god was with judah, or was god with the iron chariots after all?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He was with Judah because the Israelites are his chosen people. When he leaves them they lose.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            If god is with the israelites because the israelites are his chosen people, then god would never leave the israelites.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            God does the choosing. They are chosen because he chose them, not because they are special and deserve to be chosen by him. They are a means to his end, he is not a means to theirs. So if he opts to leave them because it's in accordance with his will, it's his right to.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Since the fact that the israelites are god's chosen people doesn't necessarily mean that god sides with them, How do you know that god was with judah in the hill country?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            - he had it written that he was with him
            - they won

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >he had it written that he was with him
            But enough about the plains
            >they won
            Was god with the iron chariots when they won against judah, or does winning not necessarily mean god was with them?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Was god with the iron chariots when they won against judah
            He wasn't

            >or does winning not necessarily mean god was with them?
            When Judah won, God was with him. When Judah lost, God was not.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why did God abandon Judah in an important battle even though bible says:
            >[...] For He Himself has said, "I will never leave you nor forsake you." So we may boldly say:
            >' The LORD is my helper;
            >I will not fear.
            >What can man do to me?'
            Did god lie and abandon Judah because he was scared of the mighty chariotchads from the plains?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It's because Judah wasn't the chosen one for that task

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            So he did abandon him. And not only that he also embarrassed him by making it seem like he lost fate. God also put everyone in danger even though he knew they wouldn't win. Some could probably die!

            That's not very nice of him is it? And it's all because he was scared of heading on the chariots at the first try...

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >And it's all because he was scared of heading on the chariots at the first try...
            It's not. He already chose someone else to attack the chariots. Judah tried to violate God's will.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >When Judah won, God was with him. When Judah lost, God was not.
            How do you know?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because God doesn't lose.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            How does
            >When judah won, god was with him. When judah lost, god was not.
            follow from
            >Because god doesn't lose
            ?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            God didn't lose, but Judah did.
            God is separate from Judah. God was not with Judah when he lost.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            How do you know god was with judah when judah won? Judah could've won without god.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Nope, because he's in a special relationship with God. When he wins it's because of God, when he loses it's his own fault.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            A special relationship with god doesn't preclude judah from winning without god, especially when you don't want to concede that judah loses because of god

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >judah loses because of god
            That's what I said though. He isn't the one God chose to win, that's why it's another Israelite that ultimately beats the iron chariots.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            He wasn't the chosen one

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    God did beat them in a later episode

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      wait the bible is just a battle shonen?

  13. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    To be fair, they were made of iron.

  14. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    he Bible verse you quoted seems to be saying that God was unable to overcome the resistance of a "few chariots". Is that true?

    First, is the translation of the verse an accurate translation?

    >Brenton Septuagint: "And the Lord was with Judas, and he inherited the mountain; for they were not able to destroy the inhabitants of the valley, for Rechab prevented them."

    We see here that there is a discrepancy between the Greek original and the Masoretic Hebrew. A simple typographical error could explain this, but it doesn't necessarily prove that the verse in question is in error.

    The second thing to examine is whether we are correctly understanding the verse. A modernized English translation reads:

    >"These people living along the coast had iron chariots, and so the people of Judah were not able to drive them out."

    This translation does a better job of making it clear to the average reader that "was not able" applies to "the people of Judah", not to God. So our original interpretation was in error. Judah, through a lack of faith, was unable to drive out the inhabitants.

    But, can God defeat chariots of iron?

    >Judges 4:12-15
    >When Sisera was told that Barak son of Abinoam had gone up Mount Tabor, he summoned all nine hundred of his iron chariots and all the men with him, from Harosheth-hagoyim to the River Kishon. Then Deborah said to Barak, “Arise, for this is the day that the LORD has delivered Sisera into your hand. Has not the LORD gone before you?” So Barak came down from Mount Tabor with ten thousand men following him. And in front of him the LORD routed with the sword Sisera, all his charioteers, and all his army.

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