Even if this work is from a Christian author, it is largely beloved because of its pagan aspects.

Even if this work is from a Christian author, it is largely beloved because of its pagan aspects.

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    ok thanks varg

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >my skydaddy is cooler then yours!
    childish.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I believe in muh chemical interactions! I am so smart!

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >believing in theories adequately describing and predicting reality is... le bad! you MUST follow le schizo rabble of israelitefolx, now that's intellectual or something!
        the absolute state of christcucks kek

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I'm convinced muh chemical interactions are really all there is because... muh chemical interactions tell me so!

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    This is actually a very interesting question. Tolkien's appreciation of pagan mythology was obviously somewhat complicated by his Catholicism, although it didn't seem to cause him any distress. How did he reconcile?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pauline Christianity is pagan in nature.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks, I promise to give this all the consideration it deserves. Any non-stupid answers?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's not like he appreciates pagan virtues that aren't compatible with Christian virtues so why would there be anything to reconcile? If Christians had thought pagans were irredeemable they wouldn't have converted them whenever possible and why wouldn't a Christian "convert" Pagan myths in a similar manner?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pagans are redeemable but their pagan traditions are at best half-truths, and possibly demonic. I think this is a pretty Orthodox position, although we don't really talk like that anymore. But Tolkien was untroubled. I don't know if he ever addressed this

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          He most definitely addressed it. It's how he changed CS Lewis from atheist to Christian.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's not authentic paganism that's represented in LotR. I'd describe it as pagan motifs grafted onto a Christian allegory.

      If you applied LotR morality to the Illiad, the Greeks would have been the orcs.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >the Greeks would have been the orcs

        This agrees with my personal life experiences too

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        LotR is literally just copying Wagner's Ring Cycle.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Tolkien believed Pagan myth was something called "sub-creation," which was an imperfect version of God creating the world, and so while they were ultimately mislead and incorrect, they still had elements of truth and were still trying to emulate God in their own way.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        He most definitely addressed it. It's how he changed CS Lewis from atheist to Christian.

        This is the smart way that Christians should approach Paganism and is definitely not the same thing as Gnosticism.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >definitely not the same thing as Gnosticism
          What's the distinction?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            In gnosticism everything in the world is evil and false and will lead to death and suffering except for the one true thing (Gnosticism)

            This has had a pretty significant historical effect in that most gnostics actually practiced what they preached and didn't have kids and so gnosticism eventually died out except for the Mandeans who are also slowly on the way to total extinction unless they relax their religious laws.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Gnosticism believes in the power of esoteric knowledge and shit. What Tolkien is talking about here is simply that pagan myths at least partially have merit to Christians. Totally different discussions.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >esoteric knowledge
            what does this mean? I thought pagans did this too, right?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            did you read the "at least partially"?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I just don't know what is meant by esoteric knowledge. Furthermore, I've been under the impression that gnosticism was closely related to christianity in some way.

            I understand what tolkien is saying, I just don't see what you mean about gnosticism not falling into the purview of those pagan things which are an approximation of the truth that christians are talking about.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, I remember that now. And he considered his own writing sub-creation as well iirc. Thanks

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think you mean Gnosticism, otherwise know as Christ's expanded universe fan fiction.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Congrats anon you learned a new word and wanted to share it with us. Unfortunately gnosticism has no relevance anywhere in the post you replied to, in Tolkien's works or in this thread.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          very low iq post. shame.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      A lot of pagans converted to Christianity because they sincerely accepted the spiritual and moral superiority of the Christian God.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >its pagan aspects.
    Such as?

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just like Catholicism, from cult of ancestors (saints) to repurposed pagan celebrations, thats how the masses experienced catholicism in their day to day lives
    With the exception of attending the mass

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's good and interesting because it's a gnostic text (All of Tolkien). Don't bring Paganism into this, Tolkien is a Gnostic in the vein of Confucius, Shakespeare, Milton, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wagner, Dostoesvky William Morris, Scriabin, Schoenberg, Fellini, Mamoru Oshii, Paddy Mcaloon, Hideaki Anno, Max Martin, Nakata.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      those are not gnostics moron

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tolkien knew a lot about God, the history of man, etc. but he wasn't a direct prophet which makes him an interesting figure in literature. Much more worthwhile than much of the Bible, but he was flawed and wasn't directly divinely inspired.

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