Did Europe become powerful because of Christianity or despite it?

Did Europe become powerful because of Christianity or despite it?

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  1. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    It became powerful due to technology

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      The pioneers of modern engineering were Dominican monks and friars.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Christianity is a technology.

        So why was Europe so bacwards between 500 and 1500?

        [...]
        The European conquest of the World was a crusade
        >European imperialism was born out of competition between European Christians and Ottoman Muslims, the latter of which rose up quickly in the 14th century and forced the Spanish and Portuguese to seek new trade routes to India, and to a lesser extent, China.

        Why was there no discovery prior to 1500 then?

        >the exact moment Protestantism rose to power Europe starts to dominate entire planet
        Really makes you think

        You're right, but you're forgetting that protestantism is crypto-atheism.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >So why was Europe so bacwards between 500 and 1500?

          It wasn't?

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            How else would you describe a continent which produced Euclid and Archimedes making essentially zero mathematical contributions for a millenia?

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Christianity is a technology.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      which Christianity fostered

  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'll tell you the same thing I tell antiracists and christcucks alike:

    If Christianity is the cause of European global success and not race, why didn't it work for shit skins of the global South, who make up the majority of Christians today?

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >no answer to this post
      They already know why.

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Europe before christianity 12000 bc to 500 ad
    Most powerful region in the World.
    >Europe during christianity 500 ad to 1500 ad
    Shithole backwater.
    >Europe after christianity 1500 ad to today
    Most powerful region in the World.

    Looks like a clear pattern.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Uhh anon post 1500 europe was still incredibly Christian

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Way less so than in the 500-1500 ad era, and most most importantly, the church became massively less powerful politically post reformation. Naturally I need to simplify when I shitpost.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >the exact moment catholic church loses its power Europe starts to dominate entire planet
      Really makes you think.

      The European conquest of the World was a crusade
      >European imperialism was born out of competition between European Christians and Ottoman Muslims, the latter of which rose up quickly in the 14th century and forced the Spanish and Portuguese to seek new trade routes to India, and to a lesser extent, China.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Dom Henrique of Portugal, Duke of Viseu (4 March 1394 – 13 November 1460), better known as Prince Henry the Navigator (Portuguese: Infante Dom Henrique, o Navegador), was a central figure in the early days of the Portuguese Empire and in the 15th-century European maritime discoveries and maritime expansion. Through his administrative direction, he is regarded as the main initiator of what would be known as the Age of Discovery. Henry was the fourth child of the Portuguese King John I, who founded the House of Aviz.[1]

        >Henry was responsible for the early development of Portuguese exploration and maritime trade with other continents through the systematic exploration of Western Africa, the islands of the Atlantic Ocean, and the search for new routes. He encouraged his father to conquer Ceuta (1415), the Muslim port on the North African coast across the Straits of Gibraltar from the Iberian Peninsula. He learned of the opportunities offered by the Saharan trade routes that terminated there, and became fascinated with Africa in general; he was most intrigued by the Christian legend of Prester John and the expansion of Portuguese trade. He is regarded as the patron of Portuguese exploration.

        >Henry was 21 when he and his father and brothers captured the Moorish port of Ceuta in northern Morocco. Ceuta had long been a base for Barbary pirates who raided the Portuguese coast, depopulating villages by capturing their inhabitants to be sold in the African slave trade. Following this success, Henry began to explore the coast of Africa, most of which was unknown to Europeans. His objectives included finding the source of the West African gold trade and the legendary Christian kingdom of Prester John, and stopping the pirate attacks on the Portuguese coast.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >On 25 May 1420, Henry gained appointment as the Grand Master of the Military Order of Christ, the Portuguese successor to the Knights Templar, which had its headquarters at Tomar in central Portugal.[7] Henry held this position for the remainder of his life, and the Order was an important source of funds for Henry's ambitious plans

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      moron alert.

      Eastern Roman Empire was the dominant power in the world until the 620s and up until 1100s the strongest power in the Mediterranean. That was despite being the most hardcore Christians.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Eastern Roman Empire was the dominant power
        Until other christians ruined it

        The church and inquisition held back science, the guy who discovered planets revolved around the sun kept it quiet until his death

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          have a nice day, mongrel.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        why didn't they stop is*am

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Despite it. Evidenced by the fact that today there are almost zero intelligent Christians, this board being proof enough of that.

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Also consider how there is a suspicious gap in notable mathematicians in the 500 ad to 1500 ad era. Between Archimedes and Descartes you basically have no norable mathematical advancement. Almost as if there was an anti-intellectual and dysgenic religion going around.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >noooo people aren't thinking about numbers n shieeet
      yeah they had more pressing matters to deal with

  6. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    what is Europe, anyways? why do people today consider the Spanish, English, slavs, germans, Greeks, Italians, etc to be somehow part of the same thing when ancient peoples didn't think this at all? the Romans found a much closer kinship with the north Africans than they did with the Germans.

    what changed in the medieval era to set the boundaries of Europe at the bosphorus and Gibraltar? why were the people south of those places now seen as fundamentally different when compared to antiquity?
    what changed past the Danube that the Germans were now considered part of the same body as the latins?
    its painfully obvious that the current boundaries of Europe are actually just the historical boundaries of Christendom.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Herodotus' creation and yes he considered all non greeks in it savages

  7. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >the exact moment catholic church loses its power Europe starts to dominate entire planet
    Really makes you think.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >le persians create le algebra and scientific method during the middle ages

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Isn't it depressing that the entirety of mathematical achievement during abrahamic tyranny boils down to what would have been average Tuesday for Euler?

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Euler

          >Euler was a religious person throughout his life.[20] Much of what is known of Euler's religious beliefs can be deduced from his Letters to a German Princess and an earlier work, Rettung der Göttlichen Offenbahrung gegen die Einwürfe der Freygeister (Defense of the Divine Revelation against the Objections of the Freethinkers). These works show that Euler was a devout Christian who believed the Bible to be inspired; the Rettung was primarily an argument for the divine inspiration of scripture.[114][115]

          >Euler opposed the concepts of Leibniz's monadism and the philosophy of Christian Wolff.[116] Euler insisted that knowledge is founded in part on the basis of precise quantitative laws, something that monadism and Wolffian science were unable to provide. Euler also labelled Wolff's ideas as "heathen and atheistic".[117]

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            And his father was a cleric. Had his father been born a few centuries earlier Euler himself would never have been born due to clerical celibacy. The church doctrine of gating education behind celibacy is one of the most dysgenic and destructive phenomena in history. There is a reason why no Eulers were born when the catholic church controlled Europe.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Clerical celibacy is a Catholic thing, it's not "Abrahamic tyranny".

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            The catholic church is but one of the many tendrils of abrahamic tyranny.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >the exact moment Protestantism rose to power Europe starts to dominate entire planet
      Really makes you think

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Religious zeal played a large role in Spanish and Portuguese overseas activities. While the Pope himself was a political power to be heeded (as evidenced by his authority to decree whole continents open to colonization by particular kings), the Church also sent missionaries to convert the indigenous peoples of other continents to the Catholic faith. Thus, the 1455 Papal Bull Romanus Pontifex granted the Portuguese all lands behind Cape Bojador and allowed them to reduce pagans and other "enemies of Christ" to perpetual slavery.[1]

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        mental illness

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        We're talking about actual European achievements like arts, sciences, and effective government. Not a bunch of moor rapebabies playing feudalism with their shitskin subjects.

  8. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >The civilizing mission or civilising mission (Spanish: misión civilizadora; Portuguese: Missão civilizadora; French: Mission civilisatrice) is a political rationale for military intervention and for colonization purporting to facilitate the modernization and the Westernization of indigenous peoples, especially in the period from the 15th to the 20th centuries. As a principle of European culture, the term was most prominently used in justifying French[1] colonialism in the late-15th to mid-20th centuries. The civilizing mission was the cultural justification for the colonial exploitation of French Algeria, French West Africa, French Indochina, Portuguese Angola and Portuguese Guinea, Portuguese Mozambique and Portuguese Timor, among other colonies. The civilizing mission also was a popular justification for the British,[2] German, [3][4] and American[citation needed] colonialism. In the Russian Empire, it was also associated with the Russian conquest of Central Asia and the Russification of that region.[5][6][7] The western European colonial powers claimed that, as Christian nations, they were duty-bound to disseminate Western civilization to what Europeans perceived as the heathen and primitive cultures of the Eastern world.

  9. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    >By 1901, Muscular Christianity was influential enough in England that one author could praise "the Englishman going through the world with rifle in one hand and Bible in the other" and add, "if asked what our muscular Christianity has done, we point to the British Empire."[25]

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >The civilizing mission or civilising mission (Spanish: misión civilizadora; Portuguese: Missão civilizadora; French: Mission civilisatrice) is a political rationale for military intervention and for colonization purporting to facilitate the modernization and the Westernization of indigenous peoples, especially in the period from the 15th to the 20th centuries. As a principle of European culture, the term was most prominently used in justifying French[1] colonialism in the late-15th to mid-20th centuries. The civilizing mission was the cultural justification for the colonial exploitation of French Algeria, French West Africa, French Indochina, Portuguese Angola and Portuguese Guinea, Portuguese Mozambique and Portuguese Timor, among other colonies. The civilizing mission also was a popular justification for the British,[2] German, [3][4] and American[citation needed] colonialism. In the Russian Empire, it was also associated with the Russian conquest of Central Asia and the Russification of that region.[5][6][7] The western European colonial powers claimed that, as Christian nations, they were duty-bound to disseminate Western civilization to what Europeans perceived as the heathen and primitive cultures of the Eastern world.

      >On 25 May 1420, Henry gained appointment as the Grand Master of the Military Order of Christ, the Portuguese successor to the Knights Templar, which had its headquarters at Tomar in central Portugal.[7] Henry held this position for the remainder of his life, and the Order was an important source of funds for Henry's ambitious plans

      >Dom Henrique of Portugal, Duke of Viseu (4 March 1394 – 13 November 1460), better known as Prince Henry the Navigator (Portuguese: Infante Dom Henrique, o Navegador), was a central figure in the early days of the Portuguese Empire and in the 15th-century European maritime discoveries and maritime expansion. Through his administrative direction, he is regarded as the main initiator of what would be known as the Age of Discovery. Henry was the fourth child of the Portuguese King John I, who founded the House of Aviz.[1]

      >Henry was responsible for the early development of Portuguese exploration and maritime trade with other continents through the systematic exploration of Western Africa, the islands of the Atlantic Ocean, and the search for new routes. He encouraged his father to conquer Ceuta (1415), the Muslim port on the North African coast across the Straits of Gibraltar from the Iberian Peninsula. He learned of the opportunities offered by the Saharan trade routes that terminated there, and became fascinated with Africa in general; he was most intrigued by the Christian legend of Prester John and the expansion of Portuguese trade. He is regarded as the patron of Portuguese exploration.

      >Henry was 21 when he and his father and brothers captured the Moorish port of Ceuta in northern Morocco. Ceuta had long been a base for Barbary pirates who raided the Portuguese coast, depopulating villages by capturing their inhabitants to be sold in the African slave trade. Following this success, Henry began to explore the coast of Africa, most of which was unknown to Europeans. His objectives included finding the source of the West African gold trade and the legendary Christian kingdom of Prester John, and stopping the pirate attacks on the Portuguese coast.

      Everyone can cherrypick sources to construct a narrative. That doesn't change the clear evidence that when christian institutions were strong Europe was weak. Also, pro christian historians/sociologists are notoriously intellectually dishonest.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        But Christianity was still strong in Europe after 1500. That's when all the hyper-religious Catholic vs Protestant stuff happened

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Clearly I am referring to the priod AFTER the wars of religion mr. pedant. When we're talking about a millenium time period I am not going to check the exact year. Although maybe 1600 would have been a better cut off point.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Thirty Years' War happened in the 17th century though

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            The wars of religion went on for a long period of time, but most of its effects were felt long before the last one ended. I guess the end of the thirty years war would make for a nice cutoff point if you want to measure everything to the accuracy of a femtosecond.

  10. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Christianity is just synonymous with technological development and advancement much to the terror of illiterate atheists. And there's clear cut examples of state sponsored atheism like North Korea, guess what, they're not the progressive paradise illiterate atheists hope for

    On the other hand atheism is synonymous with lack of education and complete disregard of the pursuit of knowledge, they accept any half baked theory because they think it's le cool science but lack any actual scientific skills or understanding. The average atheist isn't even aware of something as simple as the periodic table

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      moron

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        seething illiterate redditor. you will never disprove the connection between civilized, well developed countries being Christian and absolute savage shitholes being atheist or pagan

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          Most Christians live in the global south.
          >redditredditreddit
          election tourist spotted

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            lmao what a disingenuous redditor right here, but I don't expect a normal dialogue from an illiterate, uneducated, borderline luddite, atheist freak

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            The overwhelming majority of Atheists are in the communist part of the global south.

  11. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    neither, are you actually mentally disabled?

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